UEFA European Championship records and statistics

This is a list of records and statistics of the UEFA European Championship.

Ranking of teams by number of appearances

As of UEFA Euro 2024
Team Appearances Debut Most recent Best result
 Germany 14 1972 2024 Champions (1972, 1980, 1996)
 Spain 12 1964 2024 Champions (1964, 2008, 2012)
 Russia 12 1960 2020 Champions (1960)
 France 11 1960 2024 Champions (1984, 2000)
 Italy 11 1968 2024 Champions (1968, 2020)
 Netherlands 11 1976 2024 Champions (1988)
 Czech Republic 11 1960 2024 Champions (1976)
 England 11 1968 2024 Runners-up (2020)
 Denmark 10 1964 2024 Champions (1992)
 Portugal 9 1984 2024 Champions (2016)
 Belgium 7 1972 2024 Runners-up (1980)
 Sweden 7 1992 2020 Semi-finals (1992)
 Croatia 7 1996 2024 Quarterfinals (1996, 2008)
 Slovakia 6 1960 2024 Champions (1976)
 Serbia 6 1960 2024 Runners-up (1960, 1968)
 Turkey 6 1996 2024 Semi-finals (2008)
  Switzerland 6 1996 2024 Quarterfinals (2020)
 Romania 6 1984 2024 Quarterfinals (2000)
 Hungary 5 1964 2024 Semi-finals (1964, 1972)
 Poland 5 2008 2024 Quarterfinals (2016)
 Greece 4 1980 2012 Champions (2004)
 Ukraine 4 2012 2024 Quarterfinals (2020)
 Austria 4 2008 2024 Round of 16 (2020)
 Scotland 4 1992 2024 Group stage
 Republic of Ireland 3 1988 2016 Round of 16 (2016)
 Wales 2 2016 2020 Semi-finals (2016)
 Bulgaria 2 1996 2004 Group stage
 Slovenia 2 2000 2024 Group stage
 Albania 2 2016 2024 Group stage
 Iceland 1 2016 2016 Quarterfinals (2016)
 Northern Ireland 1 2016 2016 Round of 16 (2016)
 Norway 1 2000 2000 Group stage
 Latvia 1 2004 2004 Group stage
 Finland 1 2020 2020 Group stage
 North Macedonia 1 2020 2020 Group stage
 Georgia 1 2024 2024 Group stage

Debut of national teams

A total of 36 different UEFA members have reached the finals, 35 of whom are debuting outright. Every final tournament has seen at least one entity appearing for the first time.

Year Debuting teams Successor teams
Teams No. Cum.
1960  Czechoslovakia,  France,  Soviet Union,  Yugoslavia 4 4
1964  Denmark,  Hungary,  Spain 3 7
1968  England,  Italy 2 9
1972  Belgium,  West Germany 2 11
1976  Netherlands 1 12
1980  Greece 1 13
1984  Portugal,  Romania 2 15
1988  Republic of Ireland 1 16
1992  Scotland,  Sweden 2 18  CIS,  Germany
1996  Bulgaria,  Croatia,   Switzerland,  Turkey 4 22  Czech Republic,  Russia
2000  Norway,  Slovenia 2 24  FR Yugoslavia
2004  Latvia 1 25
2008  Austria,  Poland 2 27
2012  Ukraine 1 28
2016  Albania,  Iceland,  Northern Ireland,  Wales 4 32  Slovakia
2020  Finland,  North Macedonia 2 34
2024  Georgia 1 35  Serbia

Overall team records

As of UEFA Euro 2020

The system used in the European Championship up to 1992 was 2 points for a win, and 3 points for a win from 1996 onwards. In this ranking 3 points are awarded for a win, 1 for a draw and 0 for a loss. As per statistical convention in football, matches decided in extra time are counted as wins and losses, while matches decided by penalty shoot-outs are counted as draws. Teams are ranked by total points, then by goal difference, then by goals scored.

Rank Team Part. Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts
1  Germany 13 53 27 13 13 78 55 +23 94
2  Italy 10 45 21 18 6 52 31 +21 81
3  Spain 11 46 21 15 10 68 42 +26 78
4  France 10 43 21 12 10 69 50 +19 75
5  Netherlands 10 39 20 8 11 65 41 +24 68
6  Portugal 8 39 19 10 10 56 38 +18 67
7  England 10 38 15 13 10 51 37 +14 58
8  Czech Republic 10 37 15 7 15 48 47 +1 52
9  Russia 12 36 13 7 16 40 52 −12 46
10  Denmark 9 33 10 6 17 42 50 −8 36
11  Belgium 6 22 11 2 9 31 28 +3 35
12  Croatia 6 22 9 6 7 30 28 +2 33
13  Sweden 7 24 7 7 10 30 28 +2 28
14  Slovakia 5 15 5 4 6 17 23 −6 19
15  Greece 4 16 5 3 8 14 20 −6 18
16   Switzerland 5 18 3 8 7 16 24 −8 17
17  Wales 2 10 5 1 4 13 12 +1 16
18  Turkey 5 18 4 2 12 14 30 −16 14
19  Poland 4 14 2 7 5 11 15 −4 13
20  Serbia 5 14 3 2 9 22 39 −17 11
21  Hungary 4 11 2 4 5 14 20 −6 10
22  Ukraine 3 11 3 0 8 8 19 −11 9
23  Iceland 1 5 2 2 1 8 9 −1 8
24  Austria 3 10 2 2 6 7 12 −5 8
25  Scotland 3 9 2 2 5 5 10 −5 8
26  Romania 5 16 1 5 10 10 21 −11 8
27  Republic of Ireland 3 10 2 2 6 6 17 −11 8
28  Norway 1 3 1 1 1 1 1 0 4
29  Bulgaria 2 6 1 1 4 4 13 −9 4
30  Northern Ireland 1 4 1 0 3 2 3 −1 3
31  Albania 1 3 1 0 2 1 3 −2 3
32  Finland 1 3 1 0 2 1 3 −2 3
33  Slovenia 1 3 0 2 1 4 5 −1 2
34  Latvia 1 3 0 1 2 1 5 −4 1
35  North Macedonia 1 3 0 0 3 2 8 −6 0

Notes

  1. ^ a b Includes results of  West Germany between 1972–1988.
  2. ^ a b Includes results of  Soviet Union and  CIS between 1960–1992.
  3. ^ a b c d Includes results of  Czechoslovakia between 1960–1980.
  4. ^ Includes results of  Yugoslavia and  FR Yugoslavia between 1960–2000.

Former countries

Team Part. Pld W D L GF GA GD
 Czechoslovakia (1960–1980) 3 8 3 3 2 12 10 +2
 Yugoslavia (1960–1984) 4 10 2 1 7 14 26 −12
 Soviet Union (1960–1988) 5 13 7 2 4 17 12 +5
 West Germany (1972–1988) 5 15 9 4 2 25 13 +12
 CIS (1992) 1 3 0 2 1 1 4 −3
 FR Yugoslavia (2000) 1 4 1 1 2 8 13 −5

Medal table

The Third place playoff has been removed since 1984, meaning the losing semi-finalists are both counted under bronze since then.

RankTeamGoldSilverBronzeTotal
1 West Germany
 Germany
3339
2 Spain3115
3 Italy2215
4 France2114
5 Soviet Union
 Russia
1315
6 Czechoslovakia
 Czech Republic
1135
 Portugal1135
8 Netherlands1045
9 Czechoslovakia
 Slovakia
1023
 Denmark1023
11 Greece1001
12 Yugoslavia0202
13 England0123
14 Belgium0112
15 Hungary0011
 Sweden0011
 Turkey0011
 Wales0011
Totals (18 entries)17162861

Comprehensive team results by tournament

Map of countries' best results

Legend

For each tournament, the number of teams in each finals tournament (in brackets) are shown.

Team (36) France
1960
(4)
Spain
1964
(4)
Italy
1968
(4)
Belgium
1972
(4)
Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia
1976
(4)
Italy
1980
(8)
France
1984
(8)
West Germany
1988
(8)
Sweden
1992
(8)
England
1996
(16)
Belgium
Netherlands
2000
(16)
Portugal
2004
(16)
Austria
Switzerland
2008
(16)
Poland
Ukraine
2012
(16)
France
2016
(24)
Europe
2020
(24)
Germany
2024
(24)
United Kingdom
Republic of Ireland
2028
(24)
Italy
Turkey
2032
(24)
Times
entered
Times
qualified
 Albania × × × GS Q 14 2
 Austria GS GS R16 Q 17 4
 Belgium × 3rd 2nd GS GS QF QF Q 16 7
 Bulgaria GS GS 17 2
 Croatia Part of  Yugoslavia QF GS QF GS R16 R16 Q 8 7
 Czech Republic 3rd 1st 3rd 2nd GS SF GS QF GS QF Q 17 11
 Denmark 4th SF GS 1st GS GS QF GS SF Q 17 10
 England × 3rd GS GS GS SF GS QF QF R16 2nd Q 16 11
 Finland × × GS 15 1
 France 4th 1st GS SF 1st QF GS QF 2nd R16 Q 17 11
 Georgia Part of  Soviet Union Q 8 1
 Germany × × 1st 2nd 1st GS SF 2nd 1st GS GS 2nd SF SF R16 Q 15 14
 Greece × GS 1st GS QF 16 4
 Hungary 3rd 4th R16 GS Q 17 5
 Iceland × × × QF 14 1
 Italy × 1st 4th SF GS 2nd GS QF 2nd QF 1st Q Q 17 11
 Latvia Part of  Soviet Union GS 8 1
 Netherlands × 3rd GS 1st SF QF SF SF QF GS R16 Q 16 11
 North Macedonia Part of  Yugoslavia GS 8 1
 Northern Ireland × R16 16 1
 Norway GS 17 1
 Poland GS GS QF GS Q 17 5
 Portugal SF QF SF 2nd QF SF 1st R16 Q 17 9
 Republic of Ireland GS GS R16 17 3
 Romania GS GS QF GS GS Q 17 6
 Russia 1st 2nd 4th 2nd 2nd GS GS GS SF GS GS GS × 16 12
 Scotland × × GS GS GS Q 15 4
 Serbia 2nd 2nd 4th GS •× × QF Q 16 6
 Slovakia 3rd 1st 3rd R16 GS Q 17 6
 Slovenia Part of  Yugoslavia GS Q 8 2
 Spain •× 1st GS 2nd GS QF QF GS 1st 1st R16 SF Q 17 12
 Sweden × SF GS QF GS GS GS R16 16 7
  Switzerland × GS GS GS R16 QF Q 16 6
 Turkey GS QF SF GS GS Q Q 18 6
 Ukraine Part of  Soviet Union GS GS QF Q 8 4
 Wales × SF R16 16 2
Team (36) France
1960
(4)
Spain
1964
(4)
Italy
1968
(4)
Belgium
1972
(4)
Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia
1976
(4)
Italy
1980
(8)
France
1984
(8)
West Germany
1988
(8)
Sweden
1992
(8)
England
1996
(16)
Belgium
Netherlands
2000
(16)
Portugal
2004
(16)
Austria
Switzerland
2008
(16)
Poland
Ukraine
2012
(16)
France
2016
(24)
Europe
2020
(24)
Germany
2024
(24)
United Kingdom
Republic of Ireland
2028
(24)
Italy
Turkey
2032
(24)
Times
entered
Times
qualified

Notes

  1. ^ a b Includes three appearances as Czechoslovakia
  2. ^ Includes five appearances as West Germany
  3. ^ a b Including UEFA Euro 2024 in which Germany is already qualified as host.
  4. ^ a b Greece entered the 1964 competition, but later withdrew after refusing to play Albania. This is not counted as a qualification tournament Greece participated in.
  5. ^ Includes five appearances as the Soviet Union and one as CIS
  6. ^ Includes four appearances as Yugoslavia and one as FR Yugoslavia
  7. ^ a b Yugoslavia originally qualified for UEFA Euro 1992, but were later disqualified due to international sanctions. This is not counted as a final tournament Yugoslavia qualified for.
  8. ^ Spain refused to travel to the Soviet Union for their qualification match, so the Soviet Union qualified by walkover.

Hosts

From 1960 to 1976 the host was decided between one of the four semi-finalists. Since 1980 the hosts have automatically qualified, except in 2020 when every country had to qualify through qualification. Germany will host the next finals in 2024.

Times Nation Year(s)
4  Italy 1968, 1980, 2020, 2032
3  England 1996, 2020, 2028
 France 1960, 1984, 2016
 Germany 1988, 2020, 2024
2  Belgium 1972, 2000
 Netherlands 2000, 2020
 Spain 1964, 2020
1  Austria 2008
 Azerbaijan 2020
 Denmark 2020
 Hungary 2020
 Northern Ireland 2028
 Poland 2012
 Portugal 2004
 Republic of Ireland 2028
 Romania 2020
 Russia 2020
 Scotland 2020
 Serbia 1976
 Sweden 1992
  Switzerland 2008
 Turkey 2032
 Ukraine 2012
 Wales 2028
Results of host nations
Year Host nation(s) Finish
1960  France Fourth place
1964  Spain Champions
1968  Italy Champions
1972  Belgium Third place
1976  Yugoslavia Fourth place
1980  Italy Fourth place
1984  France Champions
1988  West Germany Semi-finals
1992  Sweden Semi-finals
1996  England Semi-finals
2000  Belgium Group stage
 Netherlands Semi-finals
2004  Portugal Runners-up
2008  Austria Group stage
  Switzerland Group stage
2012  Poland Group stage
 Ukraine Group stage
2016  France Runners-up
2020  Azerbaijan Did not qualify
 Denmark Semi-finals
 England Runners-up
 Germany Round of 16
 Hungary Group stage
 Italy Champions
 Netherlands Round of 16
 Romania Did not qualify
 Russia Group stage
 Scotland Group stage
 Spain Semi-finals
2024  Germany
2028  England
 Northern Ireland
 Republic of Ireland
 Scotland
 Wales
2032  Italy
 Turkey

Notes

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w Co-hosted the tournament.
  2. ^ As West Germany in 1988.
  3. ^ As Yugoslavia.

Results of defending finalists

Year Defending champions Finish Defending runners-up Finish
1964  Soviet Union Runners-up  Yugoslavia Did not qualify
1968  Spain Did not qualify  Soviet Union Fourth place
1972  Italy Did not qualify  Yugoslavia Did not qualify
1976  West Germany Runners-up  Soviet Union Did not qualify
1980  Czechoslovakia Third place  West Germany Champions
1984  West Germany Group stage  Belgium Group stage
1988  France Did not qualify  Spain Group stage
1992  Netherlands Semi-finals  CIS (Soviet Union) Group stage
1996  Denmark Group stage  Germany Champions
2000  Germany Group stage  Czech Republic Group stage
2004  France Quarter-finals  Italy Group stage
2008  Greece Group stage  Portugal Quarter-finals
2012  Spain Champions  Germany Semi-finals
2016  Spain Round of 16  Italy Quarter-finals
2020  Portugal Round of 16  France Round of 16
2024  Italy TBD  England TBD

Active consecutive participations

This is a list of active consecutive participations of national teams in the UEFA European Championships.

As of qualification for UEFA Euro 2024.
Team Managed to qualify since Consecutive participations
 Germany 1972 14
 France 1992 9
 Czech Republic 1996 8
 Italy 1996 8
 Portugal 1996 8
 Spain 1996 8
 Croatia 2004 6
 Poland 2008 5
 England 2012 4
 Ukraine 2012 4
 Austria 2016 3
 Belgium 2016 3
 Hungary 2016 3
 Slovakia 2016 3
  Switzerland 2016 3
 Turkey 2016 3
 Denmark 2020 2
 Netherlands 2020 2
 Scotland 2020 2

Notes

  1. ^ Includes five appearances as West Germany, alongside reunited Germany hosting UEFA Euro 2024.

Droughts

This is a list of droughts associated with the participation of national teams in the UEFA European Championships.

Longest active UEFA European Championship droughts

Does not include teams that have not yet made their first appearance or teams that no longer exist.

As of qualification for UEFA Euro 2024.
Team Last appearance EC Missed
 Norway 2000 6
 Bulgaria 2004 5
 Latvia 2004 5
 Greece 2012 3
 Iceland 2016 2
 Northern Ireland 2016 2
 Republic of Ireland 2016 2
 Finland 2020 1
 North Macedonia 2020 1
 Russia 2020 1
 Sweden 2020 1
 Wales 2020 1

Longest UEFA European Championship droughts overall

Only includes droughts begun after a team's first appearance and until the team ceased to exist.

As of qualification for UEFA Euro 2024.
Team Prev. appearance Next appearance EC Missed
 Hungary 1972 2016 10
 Slovakia 1980 2016 9
 Norway 2000 active 6
 France 1960 1984 5
 Greece 1980 2004 5
 Republic of Ireland 1988 2012 5
 Scotland 1996 2020 5
 Serbia 2000 2024 5
 Slovenia 2000 2024 5
 Bulgaria 2004 active 5
 Latvia 2004 active 5
 Denmark 1964 1984 4
 Czech Republic 1960 1976 3
1980 1996
 Spain 1964 1980 3
 Russia 1972 1988 3
 Belgium 1984 2000 3
2000 2016
 England 1968 1980 2
 Italy 1968 1980 2
 Portugal 1984 1996 2
 Romania 1984 1996 2
 Iceland 2016 active 2
 Northern Ireland 2016 active 2
 Republic of Ireland 2016 active 2

Notes

  1. ^ a b FIFA and UEFA regards both Czech Republic and Slovakia as the same entity which competed in 1960, 1976 and 1980 as Czechoslovakia.
  2. ^ FIFA and UEFA regards Serbia as the same entity which competed in 1960, 1968, 1976 and 1984 as Yugoslavia and 2000 as FR Yugoslavia.
  3. ^ FIFA and UEFA regards Russia as the same entity which competed in 1960, 1964, 1968, 1972 and 1988 as the Soviet Union and 1992 as the CIS.

Countries that have never qualified

The following teams which are current UEFA members have never qualified for the European Championship.  Bosnia and Herzegovina is the only one of these teams which appeared in the FIFA World Cup, although  Israel qualified for the 1970 tournament when it was part of AFC.

Legend

For each tournament, the number of teams in each finals tournament (in brackets) are shown.

Team (19) 1960
(4)
1964
(4)
1968
(4)
1972
(4)
1976
(4)
1980
(8)
1984
(8)
1988
(8)
1992
(8)
1996
(16)
2000
(16)
2004
(16)
2008
(16)
2012
(16)
2016
(24)
2020
(24)
2024
(24)
2028
(24)
2032
(24)
Attempts
 Andorra Not a UEFA member 7
 Armenia Part of  Soviet Union 8
 Azerbaijan Part of  Soviet Union 8
 Belarus Part of  Soviet Union 8
 Bosnia and Herzegovina Part of  Yugoslavia 7
 Cyprus × 15
 Estonia Part of  Soviet Union 8
 Faroe Islands Not a UEFA member 9
 Gibraltar Not a UEFA member 3
 Israel Part of AFC Not a UEFA member 8
 Kazakhstan Part of  Soviet Union Part of AFC 5
 Kosovo Part of  Yugoslavia 2
 Liechtenstein Not a UEFA member × × × × 8
 Lithuania Part of  Soviet Union 8
 Luxembourg × 16
 Malta × 15
 Moldova Part of  Soviet Union 8
 Montenegro Part of  Yugoslavia 4
 San Marino Not a UEFA member 9

Notes

  1. ^ a b c d e f Not a UEFA member
  2. ^ a b Part of  FR Yugoslavia/Serbia and Montenegro

Former countries

East Germany played in eight qualification competitions before the reunification of Germany in 1990.

Team (1) 1960
(4)
1964
(4)
1968
(4)
1972
(4)
1976
(4)
1980
(8)
1984
(8)
1988
(8)
1992
(8)
Attempts
 East Germany × 8

Notes

  1. ^ East Germany initially entered the qualifying competition, but they later withdrew after being reunified with West Germany, with the reunited nation of Germany therefore entering.

General statistics by tournament

Year Hosts Champions Winning coach Top scorer(s) (goals) Player of the Tournament
1960  France  Soviet Union Soviet Union Gavriil Kachalin France François Heutte (2)
Soviet Union Valentin Ivanov (2)
Soviet Union Viktor Ponedelnik (2)
Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Milan Galić (2)
Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Dražan Jerković (2)
1964  Spain  Spain Spain José Villalonga Hungary Ferenc Bene (2)
Hungary Dezső Novák (2)
Spain Chus Pereda (2)
1968  Italy  Italy Italy Ferruccio Valcareggi Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Dragan Džajić (2)
1972  Belgium  West Germany West Germany Helmut Schön West Germany Gerd Müller (4)
1976  Yugoslavia  Czechoslovakia Czechoslovakia Václav Ježek West Germany Dieter Müller (3)
1980  Italy  West Germany West Germany Jupp Derwall West Germany Klaus Allofs (3)
1984  France  France France Michel Hidalgo France Michel Platini (9) France Michel Platini
1988  West Germany  Netherlands Netherlands Rinus Michels Netherlands Marco van Basten (5) Netherlands Marco van Basten
1992  Sweden  Denmark Denmark Richard Møller Nielsen Denmark Henrik Larsen (3)
Germany Karl-Heinz Riedle (3)
Netherlands Dennis Bergkamp (3)
Sweden Tomas Brolin (3)
Denmark Peter Schmeichel
1996  England  Germany Germany Berti Vogts England Alan Shearer (5) Germany Matthias Sammer
2000  Belgium
 Netherlands
 France France Roger Lemerre Netherlands Patrick Kluivert (5)
Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Savo Milošević (5)
France Zinedine Zidane
2004  Portugal  Greece Germany Otto Rehhagel Czech Republic Milan Baroš (5) Greece Theodoros Zagorakis
2008  Austria
  Switzerland
 Spain Spain Luis Aragonés Spain David Villa (4) Spain Xavi
2012  Poland
 Ukraine
 Spain Spain Vicente del Bosque Croatia Mario Mandžukić (3)
Germany Mario Gómez (3)
Italy Mario Balotelli (3)
Portugal Cristiano Ronaldo (3)
Russia Alan Dzagoev (3)
Spain Fernando Torres (3)
Spain Andrés Iniesta
2016  France  Portugal Portugal Fernando Santos France Antoine Griezmann (6) France Antoine Griezmann
2020  Europe  Italy Italy Roberto Mancini Czech Republic Patrik Schick (5)
Portugal Cristiano Ronaldo (5)
Italy Gianluigi Donnarumma
2024  Germany To be determined
2028  England
 Northern Ireland
 Republic of Ireland
 Scotland
 Wales
To be determined
2032  Italy
 Turkey
To be determined

Note: Matthias Sammer was the first player to officially win the MVP of the tournament.

Team: Tournament position

All-time

Most championships 3,  West Germany/ Germany (1972, 1980, 1996),  Spain (1964, 2008, 2012) Most finishes in the top two 6,  West Germany/ Germany (1972, 1976, 1980, 1992, 1996, 2008) Most finishes in the top four 9,  West Germany/ Germany (1972, 1976, 1980, 1988, 1992, 1996, 2008, 2012, 2016) Most finishes in the top eight 10,  West Germany/ Germany (1972, 1976, 1980, 1984, 1988, 1992, 1996, 2008, 2012, 2016) Most European Championship Finals appearances 14,  West Germany/ Germany (every tournament since 1972) For a detailed list, see Ranking of teams by number of appearances Most second-place finishes 3,  West Germany/ Germany (1976, 1992, 2008),  Russia/ Soviet Union (1964, 1972, 1988) Most third/fourth-place finishes 4,  Netherlands (1976, 1992, 2000, 2004) Most fifth to eighth-place finishes 5,  England (1980, 1988, 1992, 2004, 2012)

Consecutive

Most consecutive championships 2,  Spain (2008–2012) Most consecutive finishes in the top two 3,  West Germany (1972–1980) Most consecutive finishes in the top four 4,  Soviet Union (1960–1972) Most consecutive finishes in the top eight 7,  West Germany/ Germany (1972–1996) Most consecutive finals tournaments 14,  West Germany/ Germany (1972–2024)

Gaps

Longest gap between successive titles 53 years,  Italy (1968–2021) Longest gap between successive appearances in the top two 32 years,  Italy (1968–2000) Longest gap between successive appearances in the top four 29 years,  Denmark (1992–2021) Longest gap between successive appearances in the top eight 32 years,  Belgium (1984–2016) Longest gap between successive appearances in the Finals 44 years,  Hungary (1972–2016)

Host team

Best finish by host team Champions,  Spain (1964),  Italy (1968, 2020),  France (1984) Worst finish by host team (24 teams) 17th–24th position,  Russia (2020),  Scotland (2020),  Hungary (2020) Worst finish by host team (16 teams) 9th–16th position,  Belgium (2000),  Austria (2008),   Switzerland (2008),  Poland (2012),  Ukraine (2012) Worst finish by host team (4 teams) 4th position,  France (1960),  Yugoslavia (1976)

Debuting teams

Best finish by a debuting team Champions,  Soviet Union (1960),  Spain (1964),  Italy (1968),  West Germany (1972) Best finish by a debuting team (after 1976) Semi-finals,  Portugal (1984),  Sweden (1992),  Wales (2016)

Other

Most finishes in the top two without ever being champions 2,  Yugoslavia (1960, 1968) Most finishes in the top four without ever being champions 3,  Yugoslavia (1960, 1968, 1976),  England (1968, 1996, 2020) Most finishes in the top eight without ever being champions 8,  England (1968, 1980, 1988, 1992, 1996, 2004, 2012, 2020) Most appearances in Finals without ever being champions 10,  England (1968, 1980, 1988, 1992, 1996, 2000, 2004, 2012, 2016, 2020) Most finishes in the top four without ever finishing in the top two 2,  Hungary (1964, 1972) Most finishes in the top eight without ever finishing in the top two 2,  Hungary (1964, 1972),  Sweden (1992, 2004),  Turkey (2000, 2008) Most appearances in Finals without ever finishing in the top two 7,  Sweden (1992, 2000, 2004, 2008, 2012, 2016, 2020) Most finishes in the top eight without ever finishing in the top four 2,  Croatia (1996, 2008),  Romania (1984, 2000) Most appearances in Finals without ever finishing in the top four 6,  Croatia (1996, 2004, 2008, 2012, 2016, 2020) Highest winning record 51.3%,  Netherlands (20 wins in 39 matches) Most played match 7,  Italy vs  Spain (1980, 1988, 2008, 2012 (2x), 2016, 2020)

Team: Tournament progression

All time

Progressed from the group stage the most times 8,  West Germany/ Germany (1980, 1988, 1992, 1996, 2008, 2012, 2016, 2020),  Portugal (1984, 1996, 2000, 2004, 2008, 2012, 2016, 2020) Eliminated in the group stage the most times 6,  CIS/ Russia (1992, 1996, 2004, 2012, 2016, 2020) Most appearances, always progressed from the group stage 8,  Portugal (1984, 1996, 2000, 2004, 2008, 2012, 2016, 2020) Most appearances, never progressed from the group stage 3,  Scotland (1992, 1996, 2020)

Consecutive

Most consecutive progressions from the group stage 8,  Portugal (1984, 1996, 2000, 2004, 2008, 2012, 2016, 2020) Most consecutive eliminations from the group stage 3,  England (1980, 1988, 1992),  CIS/ Russia (1992, 1996, 2004),  Sweden (2008, 2012, 2016),   Switzerland (1996, 2004, 2008),  Russia (2012, 2016, 2020),  Scotland (1992, 1996, 2020)

Team: Matches played/goals scored

All-time

Most matches played 53,  Germany Most wins 27,  Germany Most losses 17,  Denmark Most draws 18,  Italy Most matches played without a win 3,  Slovenia,  Latvia,  North Macedonia Most matches played before first win 8,  Romania,   Switzerland Most goals scored 78,  Germany Most goals conceded 55,  Germany Fewest goals scored 1,  Albania,  Latvia,  Norway,  Finland Fewest goals conceded 1,  Norway Most matches played always conceding a goal 11,  Ukraine Highest average of goals scored per match 1.67,  Netherlands (65 goals in 39 matches) Lowest average of goals scored per match 0.33,  Albania (1 goal in 3 matches),  Latvia (1 goal in 3 matches),  Norway (1 goal in 3 matches),  Finland (1 goal in 3 matches) Highest average of goals conceded per match 2.79,  Yugoslavia (39 goals in 14 matches) Lowest average of goals conceded per match 0.33,  Norway (1 goal in 3 matches) Most meetings between two teams 7 times,  Italy vs  Spain (1980, 1988, 2008, 2012 (twice), 2016, 2020) Most meetings between two teams, final match 2 times,  Czechoslovakia/ Czech Republic vs  West Germany/ Germany (1976, 1996) Most tournaments unbeaten 5,  Spain (1964, 1996, 2008, 2012, 2020) Most tournaments eliminated without having lost a match 3,  England (1996, 2012, 2020) Most tournaments eliminated without having won a match (since 1980) 4,  Romania (1984, 1996, 2008, 2016) Most matches played with tournament champion 5,  Portugal (1984, 2000, 2004 (twice), 2012)

Single tournament

Most wins 5,  France (1984, out of 5),  France (2000, out of 6),  Spain (2008, out of 6),  France (2016, out of 7),  Italy (2020, out of 7),  England (2020, out of 7) Fewest wins, champions (since 1980) 2,  Denmark (1992, out of 5) Fewest wins in regulation time, champions (since 1980) 1,  Portugal (2016, out of 7) Most matches not won, champions 4,  Portugal (2016, out of 7) Most wins by non-champion 5,  France (2016, out of 7),  England (2020, out of 7) Most matches not won 4,  Czech Republic (1996, out of 6),  Netherlands (2004, out of 5),  Italy (2012, out of 6),  Portugal (2016, out of 7),  Spain (2020, out of 6) Most draws 4,  Portugal (2016, out of 7),  Spain (2020, out of 6) Most losses 3,  Yugoslavia (1984),  Denmark (1988),  England (1988),  Romania (1996),  Turkey (1996),  Denmark (2000),  Bulgaria (2004),  Greece (2008),  Netherlands (2012),  Republic of Ireland (2012),  Ukraine (2016),  Northern Ireland (2016),  Turkey (2020),  North Macedonia (2020),  Ukraine (2020),  Denmark (2020) Most losses, champions 1,  Netherlands (1988),  Denmark (1992),  France (2000),  Greece (2004) Most goals scored 14,  France (1984) Most goals scored, group stage (since 1980) 9,  France (1984),  Netherlands (2008) Fewest goals scored 0,  Soviet Union (1968),  Turkey (1996),  Denmark (2000),  Ukraine (2016) Fewest goals conceded 1,  Italy (1980),  Norway (2000),  Spain (2012) Most goals conceded 13,  Yugoslavia (2000) Most goals conceded, group stage (since 1980) 10,  Yugoslavia (1984) Most minutes without conceding a goal 509,  Spain (2012) Highest goal difference +11,  Spain (2012) Lowest goal difference −8,  Yugoslavia (1984),  Denmark (2000),  Bulgaria (2004),  Republic of Ireland (2012) Lowest goal difference, champions +2,  Spain (1964),  Italy (1968),  Czechoslovakia (1976),  Denmark (1992) Highest average of goals scored per match 2.80,  France (1984) Highest average goal difference per match (since 1980) +2,  France (1984) Most goals scored, champions 14,  France (1984) Fewest goals scored, champions (since 1980) 6,  West Germany (1980),  Denmark (1992) Fewest goals scored, finalists (since 1980) 4,  Belgium (1980) Fewest goals conceded, champions (since 1980) 1,  Spain (2012) Most goals conceded, champions 7,  France (2000) Lowest average of goals scored per match, champions 1.17,  Greece (2004, 7 goals in 6 matches)

Streaks

Most consecutive successful qualification attempts 8,  Spain (1996–2024) Most consecutive failed qualification attempts 16,  Luxembourg (1964–2024) Most consecutive wins 5,  France, from 1–0 vs Denmark (1984) to 2–0 vs Spain (1984),  Netherlands, from 3–1 vs England (1988) to 1–0 vs Scotland (1992),  Czech Republic, from 2–0 vs Denmark (2000) to 3–0 vs Denmark (2004),  Italy, from 3–0 vs Turkey (2020) to 2–1 vs Belgium (2020) Most consecutive wins (qualifying and final tournaments combined) 15,  Italy (23 March 2019 – 2 July 2021) Most consecutive matches without a loss 14,  Spain, from 4–1 vs Russia (2008) to 3–0 vs Turkey (2016) Most consecutive losses 6,  Yugoslavia, from 0–2 vs Italy (1968) to 2–3 vs France (1984),  Ukraine, from 0–2 vs France (2012) to 2–3 vs Netherlands (2020) Most consecutive matches without a win 9,  Soviet Union /  CIS /  Russia, from 0–2 vs Netherlands (1988) to 0–2 vs Portugal (2004) Most consecutive draws 4,  Portugal, from 0–0 vs Spain (2012) to 3–3 vs Hungary (2016) Most consecutive matches without a draw 17,  Czech Republic, from 1–2 vs Germany (1996) to 0–1 vs Spain (2016) Most consecutive matches scoring at least one goal 11,  England, from 1–1 vs Germany (1996) to 1–0 vs Ukraine (2012) Most consecutive matches scoring at least two goals 9,  France, from 3–0 vs Denmark (2000) to 3–1 vs Switzerland (2004) Most consecutive matches scoring at least three goals 3,  France, from 5–0 vs Belgium (1984) to 3–2 vs Portugal (1984),  Netherlands, from 3–0 vs Denmark (2000) to 6–1 vs Yugoslavia (2000) Most consecutive matches scoring at least four goals 2,  Denmark, from 4–1 vs Russia (2020) to 4–0 vs Wales (2020),  Spain, from 5–0 vs Slovakia (2020) to 5–3 vs Croatia (2020) Most consecutive matches scoring at least five goals 2,  Spain, from 5–0 vs Slovakia (2020) to 5–3 vs Croatia (2020) Most consecutive matches without scoring a goal 5,  Ukraine, from 0–2 vs France (2012) to 0–1 vs Poland (2016) Most consecutive matches without conceding a goal (clean sheets) 7,  Spain, from 4–0 vs Republic of Ireland (2012) to 3–0 vs Turkey (2016) Most consecutive minutes without conceding a goal 734,  Spain (2012–2016) Most consecutive matches without conceding a goal (including qualifying) 8,  Italy, from 0–0 vs Poland (1975) to 0–0 vs Belgium (1980),  England, from 6–0 vs Bulgaria (2019) to 4–0 vs Ukraine (2020) Most consecutive minutes without conceding a goal (including qualifying) 784,  Italy (1975–1980) Most consecutive matches conceding at least one goal 11,  Ukraine, from 2–1 vs Sweden (2012) to 0–4 vs England (2020) Most consecutive matches conceding at least two goals 7,  Yugoslavia, from 0–2 vs Italy (1968) to 3–3 vs Slovenia (2000) Most consecutive matches conceding at least three goals 3,  Yugoslavia, from 0–5 vs Denmark (1984) to 3–3 vs Slovenia (2000),  Czech Republic, from 1–3 vs Portugal (2008) to 1–4 vs Russia (2012),  Hungary, from 3–3 vs Portugal (2016) to 0–3 vs Portugal (2020) Most matches played without consecutive losses 45,  Italy Most matches played without consecutive wins 16,  Romania Most matches played without consecutive draws 33,  Denmark

Individual

For records regarding goalscoring, see Goalscoring; for records regarding goalkeeping, see Goalkeeping Most consecutive finals 3, Rainer Bonhof ( West Germany, 1972–1980) Most tournaments in squad 6, Cristiano Ronaldo ( Portugal, 2004–2020, 2024 (upcoming)) Most tournaments played 5, Cristiano Ronaldo ( Portugal, 2004–2020) Most championships 2, 13 players: Rainer Bonhof ( West Germany, 1972 & 1980); Xabi Alonso, Iker Casillas, Cesc Fàbregas, Andrés Iniesta, Sergio Ramos, David Silva, Fernando Torres, Xavi, Raúl Albiol, Álvaro Arbeloa, Santi Cazorla, Pepe Reina ( Spain, 2008 & 2012) Most medals 3, Rainer Bonhof ( West Germany, 1972 (champions), 1976 (runners-up), 1980 (champions)) Most matches played, final tournament 25, Cristiano Ronaldo ( Portugal, 2004–2020) Most minutes played, final tournament 2,153, Cristiano Ronaldo ( Portugal, 2004–2020) Most matches won 12, Cristiano Ronaldo ( Portugal, 2004–2020) Most appearances in a final 2, Valentin Ivanov, Viktor Ponedelnik, Lev Yashin ( Soviet Union, 1960 & 1964); Franz Beckenbauer, Uli Hoeneß, Sepp Maier, Georg Schwarzenbeck, Herbert Wimmer ( West Germany, 1972 & 1976); Bernard Dietz ( West Germany, 1976 & 1980); Thomas Häßler, Thomas Helmer, Jürgen Klinsmann, Matthias Sammer ( Germany, 1992 & 1996); Xabi Alonso, Iker Casillas, Cesc Fàbregas, Andrés Iniesta, Sergio Ramos, David Silva, Fernando Torres, Xavi ( Spain, 2008 & 2012); Cristiano Ronaldo ( Portugal, 2004 & 2016); Leonardo Bonucci, Giorgio Chiellini ( Italy, 2012 & 2020) Most appearances as captain 16, Cristiano Ronaldo ( Portugal, 2004–2020) Most appearances in Team of the Tournament 3, Paolo Maldini ( Italy, 1988, 1996, 2000); Laurent Blanc ( France, 1992–2000); Cristiano Ronaldo ( Portugal, 2004, 2012, 2016); Pepe ( Portugal, 2008–2016) Youngest player to appear 17 years, 246 days, Kacper Kozłowski ( Poland, vs  Spain, 2020) Youngest player to appear in a final 18 years, 327 days, Renato Sanches ( Portugal, vs  France, 2016) Youngest player to appear (qualifying match) 15 years, 300 days, Martin Ødegaard ( Norway, vs  Bulgaria, 2016) Oldest player to appear 40 years, 86 days, Gábor Király ( Hungary, vs  Belgium, 26 June 2016) Oldest outfield player to appear 39 years, 91 days, Lothar Matthäus ( Germany, vs  Portugal, 20 June 2000) Oldest player to appear in a final 38 years, 232 days, Jens Lehmann ( Germany, vs  Spain, 2008) Oldest player, winning team 38 years, 53 days, Ricardo Carvalho, ( Portugal, vs  France, 2016) Oldest player to appear in a final winning team 37 years, 23 days, Arnold Mühren ( Netherlands, vs  Soviet Union, 1988) Most matches played against the same team 5, Italy Giorgio Chiellini, vs  Spain (2008, 2012 (twice), 2016, 2020)

Goalscoring

Individual

Most goals scored in final tournaments 14, Cristiano Ronaldo ( Portugal: 2 in 2004, 1 in 2008, 3 in 2012, 3 in 2016, 5 in 2020) Most goals scored in qualifying 41, Cristiano Ronaldo ( Portugal: 8 in 2008, 7 in 2012, 5 in 2016, 11 in 2020, 10 in 2024) Most goals scored, including qualifying 55, Cristiano Ronaldo ( Portugal: 2 in 2004, 9 in 2008, 10 in 2012, 8 in 2016, 16 in 2020, 10 in 2024 (ongoing)) Most goals scored in a single qualifying competition 14, Romelu Lukaku ( Belgium, 2024 qualifying) Most goals scored in a single final tournament 9, Michel Platini ( France, 1984) Most goals scored in a final tournament match 3, on eight occasions Most goals scored in a qualifying match 5, on three occasions:
Malcolm Macdonald ( England, 5–0 vs  Cyprus, 16 April 1975)
Tibor Nyilasi ( Hungary, 8–1 vs  Luxembourg, 19 October 1975)
Marco van Basten ( Netherlands, 8–0 vs  Malta, 19 December 1990) Most goals scored in a final 2, on three occasions:
Gerd Müller ( West Germany vs  Soviet Union, 1972)
Horst Hrubesch ( West Germany vs  Belgium, 1980)
Oliver Bierhoff ( Germany vs  Czech Republic, 1996) Most matches with at least one goal 10, Cristiano Ronaldo ( Portugal, 2004–2020) Most consecutive matches with at least one goal 5, Michel Platini ( France, 1984) Most matches with at least two goals 4, Cristiano Ronaldo ( Portugal, 2012–2020) Most hat-tricks 2, Michel Platini ( France, 1984) Fastest hat-trick 18 minutes, Michel Platini ( France vs  Yugoslavia, 1984) Most goals scored by a substitute in a final tournament match 3, Dieter Müller ( West Germany vs  Yugoslavia, 1976) Scoring in every match of the final tournament Viktor Ponedelnik ( Soviet Union, 2 goals in 2 matches, 1960); Chus Pereda ( Spain, 2 goals in 2 matches, 1964); Gerd Müller ( West Germany, 4 goals in 2 matches, 1972); Dieter Müller ( West Germany, 4 goals in 2 matches, 1976); Michel Platini ( France, 9 goals in 5 matches, 1984) Most tournaments with at least one goal 5, Cristiano Ronaldo ( Portugal, 2004–2020) Most tournaments with at least two goals 4, Cristiano Ronaldo ( Portugal, 2004, 2012–2020) Most tournaments with at least three goals 3, Cristiano Ronaldo ( Portugal, 2012–2020) Youngest goalscorer 18 years, 141 days, Johan Vonlanthen (  Switzerland vs  France, 2004) Youngest hat-trick scorer 22 years, 77 days, Dieter Müller ( West Germany vs  Yugoslavia, 1976) Youngest goalscorer, final 20 years, 64 days, Pietro Anastasi ( Italy vs  Yugoslavia, 1968) Youngest goalscorer, knockout stage 18 years, 317 days, Renato Sanches ( Portugal vs  Poland, 2016) Oldest goalscorer 38 years, 257 days, Ivica Vastić ( Austria vs  Poland, 2008) Oldest hat-trick scorer 28 years, 364 days, Michel Platini ( France vs  Yugoslavia, 1984) Oldest goalscorer, final 34 years, 71 days, Leonardo Bonucci ( Italy vs  England, 2020) Most penalties scored (excluding penalty shoot-outs) 3, Cristiano Ronaldo ( Portugal, 2020) Fastest goal 67 seconds, Dmitri Kirichenko ( Russia vs  Greece, 2004) Fastest penalty converted 118 seconds, Robbie Brady ( Republic of Ireland vs  France, 2016) Fastest goal by a substitute 1 minute, Alessandro Altobelli ( Italy vs  Denmark, 1988); Juan Carlos Valerón ( Spain vs  Russia, 2004); Ondrej Duda ( Slovakia vs  Wales, 2016); Ferran Torres ( Spain vs  Slovakia, 2020) Fastest goal in a final 2 minutes, Luke Shaw ( England vs  Italy, 2020) Latest goal from kickoff 120+2nd minute, Semih Şentürk ( Turkey vs  Croatia, 2008) Latest winning goal from kickoff 120+1st minute, Artem Dovbyk ( Ukraine vs  Sweden, 2020) Latest goal from kickoff in a final 113th minute, Viktor Ponedelnik ( Soviet Union vs  Yugoslavia, 1960) Latest goal from kickoff, with no goals scored in between 119th minute, Ivan Klasnić ( Croatia vs  Turkey, 2008) Latest goal from kickoff in final, with no goals scored in between 109th minute, Eder ( Portugal vs  France, 2016)

Team

Biggest margin of victory 5 goals, on five occasions:
 France 5–0  Belgium, 1984
 Denmark 5–0  Yugoslavia, 1984
 Netherlands 6–1  Yugoslavia, 2000
 Sweden 5–0  Bulgaria, 2004
 Slovakia 0–5  Spain, 2020 Biggest margin of victory, qualifying match 14 goals:  France 14–0  Gibraltar, 18 November 2023, Group B Most goals scored in a match, one team 6 goals:  Netherlands 6–1  Yugoslavia, 2000 Most goals scored in a match, both teams 9 goals:  France 4–5  Yugoslavia, 1960 Highest scoring draw 3–3, on four occasions:
 Russia vs  Czech Republic, 1996
 Yugoslavia vs  Slovenia, 2000
 Hungary vs  Portugal, 2016
 France vs   Switzerland, 2020 Largest deficit overcome in a win 2 goals, on six occasions:
 Yugoslavia, 1960 (coming from 1–3 and 2–4 down to win 5–4 vs  France)
 West Germany, 1976 (coming from 0–2 down to win 4–2 after extra time vs  Yugoslavia)
 Denmark, 1984 (coming from 0–2 down to win 3–2 vs  Belgium)
 Portugal, 2000 (coming from 0–2 down to win 3–2 vs  England)
 Czech Republic, 2004 (coming from 0–2 down to win 3–2 vs  Netherlands)
 Turkey, 2008 (coming from 0–2 down to win 3–2 vs  Czech Republic) Largest deficit overcome in a draw 3 goals:  Yugoslavia, 2000 (coming from 0–3 down to draw 3–3 vs  Slovenia) Most goals scored in extra time, both teams 3 goals, on two occasions:
 France 3–2  Portugal, 1984
 Italy 2–1  Austria, 2020 Most goals scored in a final, one team 4 goals:  Spain 4–0  Italy, 2012 Most goals scored in a final, both teams 4 goals, on two occasions:
 Czechoslovakia 2–2  West Germany, 1976
 Spain 4–0  Italy, 2012 Fewest goals scored in a final, both teams 1 goal, on three occasions:
 Portugal 0–1  Greece, 2004
 Germany 0–1  Spain, 2008
 Portugal 1–0  France, 2016 Biggest margin of victory in a final 4 goals:  Spain 4–0  Italy, 2012 Largest deficit overcome to win in a final 1 goal, on three occasions:
 Soviet Union, 1960 (coming from 0–1 down to win 2–1 after extra time vs  Yugoslavia)
 Germany, 1996 (coming from 0–1 down to win 2–1 after extra time vs  Czech Republic)
 France, 2000 (coming from 0–1 down to win 2–1 after extra time vs  Italy) Most individual goalscorers for one team, one match 5 individual goalscorers:  Croatia vs  Spain, 2020 (Pablo Sarabia, César Azpilicueta, Ferran Torres, Álvaro Morata, Mikel Oyarzabal) Most individual goalscorers for one team, one tournament 8 goalscorers:  Germany, 2012 (Mario Gómez, Lukas Podolski, Lars Bender, Philipp Lahm, Sami Khedira, Miroslav Klose, Marco Reus, Mesut Özil) Most individual goalscorers for one team, one tournament, including own goals 9 goalscorers: 6 goals by  Spain (Álvaro Morata, Aymeric Laporte, Pablo Sarabia, Ferran Torres, César Azpilicueta, Mikel Oyarzabal), 2 own goals by  Slovakia (Martin Dúbravka, Juraj Kucka), and an own goal by   Switzerland (Denis Zakaria), 2020

Tournament

Most goals scored in a tournament 142 goals, 2020 Fewest goals scored in a tournament 7 goals, 1968 Fewest goals scored in a tournament (since 1980) 27 goals, 1980 Most goals per match in a tournament 4.75 goals per match, 1976 Most goals per match in a tournament (since 1980) 2.78 goals per match, 2020 Fewest goals per match in a tournament 1.4 goals per match, 1968 Fewest goals per match in a tournament (since 1980) 1.93 goals per match, 1980 Most scorers in a tournament 80, 2020 Most players scoring at least two goals in a tournament 30, 2020 Most players scoring at least three goals in a tournament 13, 2020 Most players scoring at least four goals in a tournament 6, 2020 Most players scoring at least five goals in a tournament 2, 2000, 2020

Own goals

Top scoring teams by tournament

Teams listed in bold won the tournament.

Goalkeeping

Most clean sheets (matches without conceding) 9, Edwin van der Sar ( Netherlands, 1996–2008), Iker Casillas ( Spain, 2004–2012) Most clean sheets, one tournament 5, Iker Casillas ( Spain, 2012), Jordan Pickford ( England, 2020) Most consecutive minutes without conceding a goal (finals) 519, Iker Casillas ( Spain, 2012) Most consecutive minutes without conceding a goal (qualifying) 644, Gianluigi Buffon ( Italy, 2010–2011) Most consecutive minutes without conceding a goal (including qualifying) 784 (including 8 consecutive clean sheets), Dino Zoff ( Italy, 1975–1980) Most goals conceded 21, Petr Čech ( Czech Republic, 2004–2016) Most goals conceded, one tournament 13, Ivica Kralj ( Yugoslavia), 2000 Most goals conceded, one match 6, Ivica Kralj ( Yugoslavia), 2000 (vs  Netherlands) Fewest goals conceded, one tournament, champions 1, of 3 matches Dino Zoff ( Italy, 1968); of 6 matches Iker Casillas ( Spain, 2012) Fewest goals conceded, one tournament 1, of 3 matches Dino Zoff ( Italy, 1968); of 3 matches Thomas Myhre ( Norway, 2000); of 4 matches Gianluigi Buffon ( Italy, 2016); of 6 matches Iker Casillas ( Spain, 2012)

Coaching

Most matches coached 21, Joachim Löw ( Germany, 2008–2020) Most matches won 12, Joachim Löw ( Germany, 2008–2020) Most championships No coach has won the title on more than one occasion Foreign championship Germany Otto Rehhagel ( Greece, 2004) Most tournaments 4, Lars Lagerbäck ( Sweden, 2000–2008;  Iceland, 2016), Joachim Löw ( Germany, 2008–2020) Most nations coached 2, Guus Hiddink ( Netherlands, 1996;  Russia, 2008); Giovanni Trapattoni ( Italy, 2004;  Republic of Ireland, 2012); Dick Advocaat ( Netherlands, 2004;  Russia, 2012); Lars Lagerbäck ( Sweden, 2000–2008;  Iceland, 2016); Fernando Santos ( Greece, 2012;  Portugal, 2016–2020) Most consecutive tournaments with same team 4, Joachim Löw ( Germany, 2008–2020) Most consecutive wins 5, Michel Hidalgo ( France, 1984); Rinus Michels ( Netherlands, 1988–1992); Roberto Mancini ( Italy, 2020) Most consecutive matches without a loss 8, Rinus Michels ( Netherlands, 1988–1992); Vicente del Bosque ( Spain, 2012–2016); Fernando Santos ( Portugal, 2016–2020) Youngest coach 36 years, 333 days, Srečko Katanec ( Slovenia vs  Yugoslavia, 2000) Oldest coach 73 years, 93 days, Giovanni Trapattoni ( Republic of Ireland vs  Italy, 2012) Most championship wins as player and head coach 2, Berti Vogts,  West Germany/ Germany (1972 as non-playing squad member; 1996 as coach) Most appearances as player and head coach 24, Didier Deschamps,  France (1992, 1996 & 2000 as player; 2016 & 2020 as coach) Final appearances as both player and head coach 2, Dino Zoff,  Italy (1968 as player, 2000 as coach); Didier Deschamps,  France (2000 as player, 2016 as coach)

Refereeing

Most tournaments 3, Anders Frisk ( Sweden, 1996–2004), Kim Milton Nielsen ( Denmark, 1996–2004), Cüneyt Çakır ( Turkey, 2012–2020), Björn Kuipers ( Netherlands, 2012–2020) Most matches refereed, overall 9, Cüneyt Çakır ( Turkey, 2012–2020), Björn Kuipers ( Netherlands, 2012–2020) Most matches refereed, one tournament 5, Felix Brych ( Germany, 2020)

Discipline

Fastest sending off 24th minute, Eric Abidal,  France vs  Italy, 2008 Latest sending off 117th minute, Nuno Gomes,  Portugal vs  France, 2000 Most sendings off (all-time, player) 2, Radoslav Látal ( Czech Republic, 1996 and 2000) Most sendings off (tournament) 10 (in 31 matches), 2000 Most sendings off (all-time, team) 4,  Netherlands Most sendings off (match, both teams) 3,  Czechoslovakia (1) vs  Netherlands (2), 1976 Sent off in final match Yvon Le Roux,  France vs  Spain, 1984 Most cards (all-time, player) 8, Giorgos Karagounis ( Greece, 2004–2012) Most cautions (tournament) 205 (in 51 matches), 2016 Most cautions (match, both teams) 10,  Czech Republic (4) vs  Germany (6), 1996 (first round);  Czech Republic (6) vs  Portugal (4), 1996;  Italy (6) vs  Netherlands (4), 2000;  Portugal (6) vs  France (4), 2016 Most cautions (final match, both teams) 10,  Portugal (6) vs  France (4), 2016 Fastest penalty kick conceded 1 minute, Paul Pogba,  France vs  Republic of Ireland, 2016

Attendance

Highest attendance in a final tournament match & highest attendance in a final 79,115,  Soviet Union vs  Spain, 21 June 1964, Santiago Bernabéu, Madrid, Spain, 1964 Lowest attendance in a Finals match 3,869,  Hungary vs  Denmark, 20 June 1964, Camp Nou, Barcelona, Spain, 1964 Highest average attendance per match 59,243, 1988 Highest total attendance (tournament) 2,427,303, 2016 Lowest average attendance per match 19,740, 1960 Lowest total attendance (tournament) 78,958, 1960

Penalty shoot-outs

Most shoot-outs, team, all-time 7,  Italy Most shoot-outs, team, tournament 2,  England, 1996;  France, 1996;  Poland, 2016;   Switzerland, 2020;  Spain, 2020;  Italy, 2020 Most shoot-outs, all teams, tournament 4, 1996, 2020 Most shoot-out wins, team, all-time 4,  Spain,  Italy Most wins, team, tournament 2,  Italy, 2020 Most shoot-out losses, team, all-time 4,  England Most shoot-outs with 100% record (all won) 3,  Czechoslovakia/ Czech Republic Most shoot-outs with 0% record (all lost) 1,  Croatia,  Sweden Most successful kicks, shoot-out, one team 9 (out of 9),  Czechoslovakia, vs Italy, 1980 Most successful kicks, shoot-out, both teams 17 (out of 18),  Czechoslovakia (9) vs  Italy (8), 1980 Most successful kicks, team, all-time 29 (out of 41),  Italy Most successful kicks, team, tournament 10,  France, 1996 (in 2 shoot-outs) Most successful kicks, all teams, tournament 37, 1996 (in 4 shoot-outs) Most successful kicks, player 2, Zinedine Zidane, Youri Djorkaeff, Bixente Lizarazu, Vincent Guérin, Laurent Blanc ( France, 1996); Alan Shearer, David Platt, Stuart Pearce, Paul Gascoigne ( England, 1996); Patrick Kluivert ( Netherlands, 1996–2000); Cesc Fàbregas ( Spain, 2008–2012); Cristiano Ronaldo ( Portugal, 2004 & 2016); Nani ( Portugal, 2012–2016); Robert Lewandowski, Arkadiusz Milik, Kamil Glik ( Poland, 2016); Fabian Schär (  Switzerland, 2016–2020); Mario Gavranović (  Switzerland, 2020); Gerard Moreno ( Spain, 2020); Leonardo Bonucci, Federico Bernardeschi ( Italy, 2020) Most kicks taken, shoot-out, both teams 18,  Czechoslovakia (9) vs  Italy (9), 1980;  Germany (9) vs  Italy (9), 2016 Most kicks taken, team, all-time 41,  Italy (in 7 shoot-outs) Most kicks taken, team, tournament 11,  France, 1996 (in 2 shoot-outs) Most kicks taken, all teams, tournament 42, 1996 (in 4 shoot-outs) Most kicks missed, shoot-out, one team 4,  Italy, vs Germany, 2016 Most kicks missed, shoot-out, both teams 7,  Germany (3) vs  Italy (4), 2016 Most kicks missed, team, all-time 12,  Italy (in 7 shoot-outs) Most kicks missed, team, tournament 4,  Italy, 2016 (in 1 shoot-out);  Spain, 2020 (in 2 shoot-outs) Most kicks missed, all teams, tournament 14, 2020 (in 4 shoot-outs) Fewest successful kicks, shoot-out, one team 1,  Netherlands, vs Italy, 2000;  Croatia, vs Turkey, 2008;   Switzerland, vs Spain, 2020 Fewest successful kicks, shoot-out, both teams 4,  Italy (3) vs  Netherlands (1), 2000;  Turkey (3) vs  Croatia (1), 2008;  Spain (3) vs   Switzerland (1), 2020 Most saves, all-time 3, Iker Casillas ( Spain, 2008–2012); Gianluigi Buffon ( Italy, 2008–2016); Unai Simón ( Spain, 2020), Gianluigi Donnarumma ( Italy, 2020) Most saves, tournament 3, Unai Simón ( Spain, 2020), Gianluigi Donnarumma ( Italy, 2020) Most saves, shoot-out 2, Francesco Toldo ( Italy), vs Netherlands, 2000; Iker Casillas ( Spain), vs Italy, 2008; Manuel Neuer ( Germany), vs Italy, 2016; Unai Simón ( Spain), vs Switzerland, 2020, Gianluigi Donnarumma ( Italy) vs England, 2020

Other

See also

Notes

  1. ^ Pan–European edition hosted by 11 countries: Azerbaijan, Denmark, England, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Netherlands, Romania, Russia, Scotland and Spain.
  2. ^ Excluding automatic qualification as host, as reigning champion, or by invitation.
  3. ^ Platini's two hat-tricks were scored in consecutive matches.
  4. ^ Defined as a player who played all matches for a team that reached the final or the third-place match, meaning their team played the maximum number of matches.
  5. ^ All eight were yellow cards.

References

  1. ^ "EURO » All-time league table". WorldFootball.net. Retrieved 25 November 2022.
  2. ^ "EURO Qualifiers » All-time league table". WorldFootball.net. Retrieved 21 November 2019.
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