Somers Point, New Jersey

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Somers Point, New Jersey
City
The shoreline at Somers Point, looking south from the north end of the former Beesley's Point BridgeThe shoreline at Somers Point, looking south from the north end of the former Beesley's Point Bridge
Official seal of Somers Point, New JerseySeal
Motto: "The Shore Starts Here"
Map of Somers Point in Atlantic County. Inset: Location of Atlantic County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.Map of Somers Point in Atlantic County. Inset: Location of Atlantic County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Somers Point, New JerseyCensus Bureau map of Somers Point, New Jersey
Somers Point is located in Atlantic County, New JerseySomers PointSomers PointLocation in Atlantic CountyShow map of Atlantic County, New JerseySomers Point is located in New JerseySomers PointSomers PointLocation in New JerseyShow map of New JerseySomers Point is located in the United StatesSomers PointSomers PointLocation in the United StatesShow map of the United States
Coordinates: 39°19′02″N 74°36′23″W / 39.317225°N 74.60637°W / 39.317225; -74.60637
Country United States
State New Jersey
CountyAtlantic
European settlement1693
IncorporatedApril 24, 1886 (as Borough)
ReincorporatedApril 2, 1890
ReincorporatedApril 9, 1902 (as city)
Government
 • TypeCity
 • BodyCity Council
 • MayorDennis Tapp (R, term ends December 31, 2027)
 • AdministratorJason Frost
 • Municipal clerkLucy R. Samuelsen
Area
 • Total5.23 sq mi (13.55 km2)
 • Land4.01 sq mi (10.39 km2)
 • Water1.22 sq mi (3.17 km2)  23.37%
 • Rank270th of 565 in state
18th of 23 in county
Elevation16 ft (5 m)
Population (2020)
 • Total10,469
 • Estimate (2023)10,465
 • Rank235th of 565 in state
7th of 23 in county
 • Density2,610.7/sq mi (1,008.0/km2)
  • Rank243rd of 565 in state
5th of 23 in county
Time zoneUTC−05:00 (Eastern (EST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC−04:00 (Eastern (EDT))
ZIP Code08244
Area code609 exchanges: 601, 653, 926, 927
FIPS code34001684307
GNIS feature ID0885397
Websitewww.somerspointgov.org

Somers Point is a city situated on the Jersey Shore that is the oldest settlement in Atlantic County, in the U.S. state of New Jersey. It was settled by Europeans in 1693 and was incorporated as a borough in 1886. Somers Point was incorporated as a city in 1902. The city is located in eastern Atlantic County, southwest of Atlantic City, in the South Jersey region of the state.

As of the 2020 United States census, the city's population was 10,469, a decrease of 326 (−3.0%) from the 2010 census count of 10,795, which in turn reflected a decline of 819 (−7.1%) from the 11,614 counted in the 2000 census. Somers Point and all of Atlantic County lie within the Atlantic City-Hammonton metropolitan statistical area, which in turn constitutes part of the Philadelphia-Reading-Camden combined statistical area.

History

Historical Somers Mansion

The earliest residents of the area were the Lenape Native Americans. John Somers was the first European settler in what is now Somers Point. Somers purchased the land along the northern periphery of the Great Egg Harbor Bay from Thomas Budd in 1693, making it the oldest European settlement in what is now Atlantic County. Great Egg Harbour Township was designated in 1693 from the eastern portions of Gloucester County, which included Somers Point. Somers named the area Somerset Plantation. In 1695, John Somers operated the first ferry service across the Great Egg Harbor Bay to Cape May County. His son Richard built Somers Mansion overlooking the harbor sometime between 1720 and 1726, which remains the county's oldest existing home. Early names for the area were Somerset Plantation, Somers Ferry, and Somers Plantation, until the name Somers Point was established in 1750. Somers Point was designated as a port of entry in 1791 and remained one until it was abolished in 1915. By the 1830s, when Somers Point became part of Atlantic County, it was a popular summer resort with several boarding houses.

Panoramic map of "Somers-Point" with list of landmarks and images of several inset (1925)

Somers Point was originally incorporated as a borough by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on April 24, 1886, from portions of Egg Harbor Township, based on the results of a referendum held five days earlier. At that time, there were 48 people registered to vote in the borough. Somers Point was subsequently reincorporated as a borough on April 2, 1890 based on the previous day's referendum, and was finally incorporated as a city on April 9, 1902, from all of Somers Point borough and additional portions of Egg Harbor Township. All were named for John Somers.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city had a total area of 5.23 square miles (13.55 km2), including 4.01 square miles (10.39 km2) of land and 1.22 square miles (3.17 km2) of water (23.37%).

Unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the township include Ocean Heights.

The city borders Egg Harbor Township, Longport and Linwood in Atlantic County; and both Ocean City and Upper Township in Cape May County.

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.Note
1890191
190030861.3%
191060496.1%
192084339.6%
19302,073145.9%
19401,992−3.9%
19502,48024.5%
19604,50481.6%
19707,91975.8%
198010,33030.4%
199011,2168.6%
200011,6143.5%
201010,795−7.1%
202010,469−3.0%
2023 (est.)10,4650.0%
Population sources: 1890–2000
1890–1920 1890–1920
1890–1910 1910–1930
1940–2000 2000
2010 2020

2010 census

The 2010 United States census counted 10,795 people, 4,655 households, and 2,826 families in the city. The population density was 2,678.8 per square mile (1,034.3/km2). There were 5,556 housing units at an average density of 1,378.7 per square mile (532.3/km2). The racial makeup was 78.75% (8,501) White, 10.68% (1,153) Black or African American, 0.25% (27) Native American, 3.08% (332) Asian, 0.06% (6) Pacific Islander, 4.17% (450) from other races, and 3.02% (326) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 9.49% (1,024) of the population.

Of the 4,655 households, 26.2% had children under the age of 18; 36.8% were married couples living together; 18.2% had a female householder with no husband present and 39.3% were non-families. Of all households, 31.9% were made up of individuals and 11.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.32 and the average family size was 2.90.

21.3% of the population were under the age of 18, 9.0% from 18 to 24, 24.0% from 25 to 44, 31.1% from 45 to 64, and 14.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41.4 years. For every 100 females, the population had 88.5 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and older there were 84.5 males.

The Census Bureau's 2006–2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $47,312 (with a margin of error of +/− $4,646) and the median family income was $51,489 (+/− $7,704). Males had a median income of $45,385 (+/− $6,862) versus $37,536 (+/− $3,731) for females. The per capita income for the city was $29,626 (+/− $1,822). About 11.9% of families and 12.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 25.6% of those under age 18 and 6.6% of those age 65 or over.

2000 census

At the 2000 United States census, there were 11,614 people, 4,920 households and 2,952 families residing in the city. The population density was 2,883.1 inhabitants per square mile (1,113.2/km2). There were 5,402 housing units at an average density of 1,341.0 per square mile (517.8/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 85.66% White, 7.01% African American, 0.25% Native American, 3.17% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 2.25% from other races, and 1.64% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 5.99% of the population.

There were 4,920 households, of which 29.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 41.2% were married couples living together, 14.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 40.0% were non-families. 32.9% of all households were made up of individuals, and 11.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.32 and the average family size was 2.97.

Age distribution was 23.4% under the age of 18, 7.1% from 18 to 24, 31.6% from 25 to 44, 22.9% from 45 to 64, and 15.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females, there were 88.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 84.2 males.

The median household income was $42,222, and the median family income was $51,868. Males had a median income of $39,650 versus $28,691 for females. The per capita income for the city was $22,229. About 5.0% of families and 7.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 8.3% of those under age 18 and 2.3% of those age 65 or over.

Economy

The largest employer in Somers Point is Shore Medical Center, with 1,500 employees, 370 physicians, and 296 beds.

Somers Point is the home to the largest crabbing tournament in the United States, the Assault on Patcong Creek. Founded in 2010, the tournament takes place annually in June and attracts participants from over a dozen states.

Parks and recreation

Portions of the Right-of-way of the Atlantic City and Shore Railroad, running for 6 miles (9.7 km) between Pleasantville and Somers Point have been repurposed as the Somers Point Bike Path. Along the Somers Point bay lays a 6.18 acre park named after 35th United .States President John F. Kennedy.

Government

Local government

Somers Point is governed under the City form of government, as one of 15 municipalities (of the 564) statewide that use this traditional form of government. The governing body is comprised of the Mayor and the seven-member City Council, all elected on a partisan basis as part of the November general election. The mayor serves a four-year term, with a single council at-large seat and one council member from each of the two wards up for election each year in a three-year cycle. The Mayor is responsible for the health, safety and welfare of the municipality. As the city's Chief Executive Officer, the Mayor puts into effect the municipal laws, known as ordinances. The Mayor can veto ordinances and may vote in the event of a tie. The Mayor makes appointments to certain boards, including the Planning Board, Recreation Commission, and Environmental Commission. The Council elects one of its members as President to chair the Council meetings and perform the other duties of a presiding officer. The City Council enacts ordinances, adopts an annual budget and sets policy for the city.

As of 2024, the Mayor of Somers Point is Republican Dennis Tapp, whose term of office ends on December 31, 2027. Members of the City Council are Council President Janice Johnston (R, 2024; 1st Ward), Richard L. DePamphilis III (R, 2026; 1st Ward), Charles J. Haberkorn (R, 2026; 2nd Ward), Howard W. Dill (R, 2024; 2nd Ward), Joseph T. McCarrie Jr. (R, 2024; At Large), Sean T. McGuigan (R, 2025; 1st Ward) and Michael Owen (R, 2025; 2nd Ward).

After Stacy Ferreri resigned in January 2022 from her seat expiring in December 2023, the City Council appointed Ken Adams, though Adams was forced to step down in February after it was discovered that he had a felony conviction that disqualified him from serving. In March 2022, Richard DePamphilis was appointed to fill the vacant seat. In the November 2022 general election, DePamphilis won the balance of the term of office.

In August 2019, the City Council selected Janice Johnston from a list of three candidates nominated by the Republican municipal committee to fill the First Ward seat expiring in December 2021 that had been held by Ron Meischker until he resigned the previous month after announcing that he was moving out of the city.

In September 2017, the City Council selected Ron Meischker from a list of three candidates nominated by the Republican Municipal Committee to fill the vacant 1st Ward seat expiring in December 2018 that had been held by Thomas Smith until he resigned from office earlier that month.

In January 2016, the City Council selected James Toto from three names nominated by the Republican municipal committee to fill the 2nd Ward seat expiring in 2017 that was vacated by Maureen Kern when she took office as a member of the Atlantic County Board of Chosen Freeholders. Toto served on an interim basis until the November 2016 general election, when he was elected to serve the balance of the term.

In elections held on November 8, 2011, Jack Glasser defeated Democrat-turned Independent Daniel Gudauskas by 1,650–558, making it the largest margin of victory in a contested election on the municipal level in Somers Point history. Triboletti and Kern ran unopposed in the first and second wards respectively.

Federal, state and county representation

Somers Point is located in the 2nd Congressional District and is part of New Jersey's 2nd state legislative district.

For the 118th United States Congress, New Jersey's 2nd congressional district is represented by Jeff Van Drew (R, Dennis Township). New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Democrats Cory Booker (Newark, term ends 2027) and Bob Menendez (Englewood Cliffs, term ends 2025).

For the 2024-2025 session, the 2nd legislative district of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the New Jersey Senate by Vincent J. Polistina (R, Egg Harbor Township) and in the General Assembly by Don Guardian (R, Atlantic City) and Claire Swift (R, Margate City).

Atlantic County is governed by a directly elected county executive and a nine-member Board of County Commissioners, responsible for legislation. The executive serves a four-year term and the commissioners are elected to staggered three-year terms, of which four are elected from the county on an at-large basis and five of the commissioners represent equally populated districts. As of 2024, Atlantic County's Executive is Dennis Levinson (R, Northfield), whose term of office ends December 31, 2027. Members of the Board of County Commissioners are:

Ernest D. Coursey (D, District 1-- Atlantic City, Egg Harbor Township (part), Longport, Margate City, and Ventnor City; 2025, Atlantic City), Chair Maureen Kern (R, District 2-- Egg Harbor Township (part), Linwood, Northfield, Somers Point and Pleasantville; 2024, Somers Point), Andrew Parker III (R, District 3-- Egg Harbor Township (part) and Hamilton Township (part); 2026, Egg Harbor Township), Richard R. Dase (R, District 4, including Brigantine, Galloway Township, Egg Harbor Township (part), and Port Republic; 2025, Galloway Township), Vice Chair James A. Bertino (R, District 5-- Buena, Buena Vista Township, Corbin City, Egg Harbor City, Estell Manor, Folsom, Hamilton Township (part), Hammonton, Mullica Township and Weymouth Township; 2024, Hammonton), June Byrnes (R, At-Large; 2026, Linwood), Frank X. Balles (R, At-Large; Pleasantville, 2024) Amy L. Gatto (R, At-large; 2025, Hamilton Township) and John W. Risley (R, At-Large; 2026, Egg Harbor Township)

Atlantic County's constitutional officers are: Clerk Joesph J. Giralo (R, 2026, Hammonton), Sheriff Joe O'Donoghue (R, 2026, Egg Harbor Township) and Surrogate James Curcio (R, 2025, Hammonton).

Politics

As of March 2011, there were a total of 6,619 registered voters in Somers Point City, of which 1,624 (24.5% vs. 30.5% countywide) were registered as Democrats, 1,979 (29.9% vs. 25.2%) were registered as Republicans and 3,009 (45.5% vs. 44.3%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 7 voters registered as Libertarians or Greens. Among the city's 2010 Census population, 61.3% (vs. 58.8% in Atlantic County) were registered to vote, including 77.9% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 76.6% countywide).

In the 2012 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 2,506 votes (53.5% vs. 57.9% countywide), ahead of Republican Mitt Romney with 2,077 votes (44.4% vs. 41.1%) and other candidates with 53 votes (1.1% vs. 0.9%), among the 4,681 ballots cast by the city's 7,075 registered voters, for a turnout of 66.2% (vs. 65.8% in Atlantic County). In the 2008 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 2,597 votes (51.5% vs. 56.5% countywide), ahead of Republican John McCain with 2,309 votes (45.8% vs. 41.6%) and other candidates with 71 votes (1.4% vs. 1.1%), among the 5,042 ballots cast by the city's 7,120 registered voters, for a turnout of 70.8% (vs. 68.1% in Atlantic County). In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 2,529 votes (51.2% vs. 46.2% countywide), ahead of Democrat John Kerry with 2,313 votes (46.9% vs. 52.0%) and other candidates with 43 votes (0.9% vs. 0.8%), among the 4,936 ballots cast by the city's 6,642 registered voters, for a turnout of 74.3% (vs. 69.8% in the whole county).

In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 1,963 votes (64.3% vs. 60.0% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barbara Buono with 938 votes (30.7% vs. 34.9%) and other candidates with 49 votes (1.6% vs. 1.3%), among the 3,052 ballots cast by the city's 7,272 registered voters, yielding a 42.0% turnout (vs. 41.5% in the county). In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 1,677 votes (51.3% vs. 47.7% countywide), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 1,282 votes (39.2% vs. 44.5%), Independent Chris Daggett with 224 votes (6.8% vs. 4.8%) and other candidates with 42 votes (1.3% vs. 1.2%), among the 3,271 ballots cast by the city's 6,794 registered voters, yielding a 48.1% turnout (vs. 44.9% in the county).

Somers Point native Maureen Kern currently serves as a member of the Atlantic County Board of Chosen Commissioners.

Historic district

Bay Front Historic District
U.S. National Register of Historic Places
U.S. Historic district
New Jersey Register of Historic Places
LocationRoughly bounded by Decatur Avenue, Egg Harbor Bay, George Avenue, and Shore Road
Area82 acres (33 ha)
Architectural styleBungalow/craftsman, Stick/eastlake, Cottage
NRHP reference No.89000227
NJRHP No.423
Significant dates
Added to NRHPMarch 22, 1989
Designated NJRHPFebruary 9, 1989

The Bay Front Historic District is a 82-acre (33 ha) historic district encompassing an area roughly bounded by Decatur Avenue, Egg Harbor Bay, George Avenue, and Shore Road in the community. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places on March 22, 1989 for its significance in architecture, entertainment/recreation, and social history. The district includes 189 contributing buildings.

Education

Students in pre-kindergarten through eighth grade are served by the Somers Point Public Schools. As of the 2018–19 school year, the district, comprised of three schools, had an enrollment of 894 students and 95.5 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 9.4:1. Schools in the district (with 2018–19 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics) are New York Avenue School with 70 students in pre-kindergarten, Dawes Avenue School with 387 students in grades Kindergarten through 3rd grade and Jordan Road Middle School with 425 students in 4th through 8th grade.

Students in public school for ninth through twelfth grades attend Mainland Regional High School, which also serves students from Linwood and Northfield. The high school is located in Linwood. For the 1997–1998 school year, Mainland Regional High School was recognized by the United States Department of Education as a National Blue Ribbon School. As of the 2018–2019 school year, the high school had an enrollment of 1,226 students and 112.0 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 10.9:1.

City public school students are also eligible to attend the Atlantic County Institute of Technology in the Mays Landing section of Hamilton Township or the Charter-Tech High School for the Performing Arts, located in Somers Point.

St. Joseph Regional School is an elementary school serving students in kindergarten through eighth grade, operated under the jurisdiction of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Camden.

Transportation

The northbound Garden State Parkway at U.S. Route 9 in Somers Point

Roads and highways

As of May 2010, the city had a total of 55.39 miles (89.14 km) of roadways, of which 43.19 miles (69.51 km) were maintained by the municipality, 5.45 miles (8.77 km) by Atlantic County and 3.73 miles (6.00 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation and 3.02 miles (4.86 km) by the New Jersey Turnpike Authority.

The Garden State Parkway passes through the city, connecting Egg Harbor Township on either side of the city. Interchange 30 for the Parkway is located in the city, signed for Somers Point and Downtown Ocean City.

On the city's southern border, bridges connect to Cape May County via the Garden State Parkway to Upper Township, into Ocean City via Route 52 and over the Beesley's Point Bridge, which has been demolished. As part of a $400 million project completed by the New Jersey Department of Transportation in 2012, a new causeway for Route 52 was completed over Great Egg Harbor Bay, replacing the Howard S. Stainton Memorial Causeway that had been completed in 1933. the Beesley's Point Bridge was demolished in 2013 as part of a project adding a new bridge for traffic on the Parkway.

Public transportation

NJ Transit offers bus transportation in the city between Ocean City and Atlantic City on the 507 and 509 routes.

Popular culture

The 1983 movie Eddie and the Cruisers was largely filmed in Somers Point, using the defunct Tony Mart's nightclub as a setting.

Notable people

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Somers Point include:

See also

References

  1. ^ Kuperinsky, Amy. "'The Jewel of the Meadowlands'?: N.J.'s best, worst and weirdest town slogans", NJ Advance Media for NJ.com, January 22, 2015. Accessed July 12, 2016. "Somers Point, rich with views of Atlantic County's Great Egg Harbor Bay, has signs that say 'The Shore Starts Here'. They went up this past summer, says Michael Bray, chairman of the Somers Point Economic Development Advisory Commission. 'We're positioned in such a way that we're a year-round community,' he says."
  2. ^ a b c d e 2019 Census Gazetteer Files: New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 1, 2020.
  3. ^ a b US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  4. ^ a b Mayorr, City of Somers Point. Accessed May 23, 2024.
  5. ^ 2023 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs, updated February 8, 2023. Accessed February 10, 2023.
  6. ^ Department of Administration, City of Somers Point. Accessed May 23, 2024.
  7. ^ Office of the City Clerk, City of Somers Point. Accessed May 23, 2024.
  8. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 8.
  9. ^ "ArcGIS REST Services Directory". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved October 11, 2022.
  10. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: City of Somers Point, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 14, 2013.
  11. ^ a b c d e QuickFacts Somers Point city, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed January 5, 2023.
  12. ^ a b c Total Population: Census 2010 - Census 2020 New Jersey Municipalities, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed December 1, 2022.
  13. ^ a b Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Minor Civil Divisions in New Jersey: April 1, 2020 to July 1, 2023, United States Census Bureau, released May 2024. Accessed May 16, 2024.
  14. ^ a b Population Density by County and Municipality: New Jersey, 2020 and 2021, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed March 1, 2023.
  15. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code, United States Postal Service. Accessed November 27, 2011.
  16. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed November 19, 2013.
  17. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Somers Point, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed November 19, 2013.
  18. ^ a b U.S. Census website, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  19. ^ Geographic Codes Lookup for New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed April 1, 2022.
  20. ^ US Board on Geographic Names, United States Geological Survey. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  21. ^ a b c d e DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Somers Point city, Atlantic County, New Jersey Archived February 12, 2020, at archive.today, United States Census Bureau. Accessed January 1, 2012.
  22. ^ a b Table DP-1. Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Somers Point city Archived May 13, 2012, at the Wayback Machine, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed January 1, 2012.
  23. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed May 1, 2023.
  24. ^ New Jersey: 2020 Core Based Statistical Areas and Counties, United States Census Bureau. Accessed February 1, 2023.
  25. ^ "New Jersey State Historic Sites". New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection. January 3, 2018. Retrieved March 1, 2018.
  26. ^ a b c Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 70. Accessed May 30, 2024.
  27. ^ "A Short History of Somers Point", Somers Point Historical Society. Accessed May 22, 2017. "Somers Point was originally settled by John Somers, an Englishman and practicing Quaker, who bought the land from Thomas Budd. Early names for the area were Somerset Plantation, Somers Ferry, and Somers Plantation, named after the first settlers in 1693."
  28. ^ a b c "Community Profile". City of Somers Point. Retrieved December 21, 2017.
  29. ^ Somers' Mansion, Col. Richard Somers Chapter. Accessed May 22, 2017. "Somers Mansion, situated on Shore Road in Somers Point, NJ, is the oldest house in Atlantic County. It was built about 1725 by Richard Somers, oldest son of John Somers."
  30. ^ "An Historic Trip Up the Great Egg Harbor River", Somers Point Historical Society. Accessed November 20, 2013.
  31. ^ Treasury decisions under customs and other laws, p. 804. United States Department of the Treasury, 1916. Accessed November 20, 2013.
  32. ^ Barber, John Warner. Historical Collections of the State of New Jersey: Containing a General Collection of the Most Interesting Facts, Traditions, Biographical Sketches, Anecdotes, Etc., Relating to Its History and Antiquities, with Geographical Descriptions of Every Township in the State, p. 64. Accessed March 8, 2020.
  33. ^ Honeyman, Abraham Van Doren. Index-analysis of the Statutes of New Jersey, 1896-1909: Together with References to All Acts, and Parts of Acts, in the 'General Statutes' and Pamphlet Laws Expressly Repealed: and the Statutory Crimes of New Jersey During the Same Period, p. 262. New Jersey Law Journal Publishing Company, 1910. Accessed October 3, 2015.
  34. ^ Hutchinson, Viola L. The Origin of New Jersey Place Names, New Jersey Public Library Commission, May 1945. Accessed October 3, 2015.
  35. ^ Gannett, Henry. The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States, p. 287. United States Government Printing Office, 1905. Accessed October 3, 2015.
  36. ^ Locality Search, State of New Jersey. Accessed May 21, 2015.
  37. ^ Areas touching Somers Point, MapIt. Accessed March 8, 2020.
  38. ^ Atlantic County District Map, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Accessed May 23, 2024.
  39. ^ New Jersey Municipal Boundaries, New Jersey Department of Transportation. Accessed November 15, 2019.
  40. ^ Barnett, Bob. Population Data for Atlantic County Municipalities, 1840 - 2000, WestJersey.org. December 6, 2010. Accessed November 20, 2013.
  41. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed November 19, 2013.
  42. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed August 12, 2013.
  43. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 335. Accessed August 4, 2012.
  44. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 714. Accessed January 1, 2012.
  45. ^ Table 6: New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1940 - 2000, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network, August 2001. Accessed May 1, 2023.
  46. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Somers Point city, New Jersey Archived June 5, 2012, at the Wayback Machine, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 4, 2012.
  47. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Somers Point city, Atlantic County, New Jersey Archived February 12, 2020, at archive.today, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 4, 2012.
  48. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006–2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Somers Point city, Atlantic County, New Jersey Archived February 12, 2020, at archive.today, United States Census Bureau. Accessed January 1, 2012.
  49. ^ About, Shore Medical Center. Accessed May 22, 2017.
  50. ^ "Individual Hospital Statistics for New Jersey". American Hospital Directory. Retrieved December 21, 2017.
  51. ^ Marino, Suzanne. "Patcong Creek Foundation, crab tourney support environmental initiatives", The Current of Egg Harbor Township, January 25, 2017. Accessed May 22, 2017. "Harbormaster Ron Meischker organizes the annual Assault on Patcong Creek crabbing tournament here – the success of which spawned the Patcong Creek Foundation, a nonprofit organization that looks to help the local environment through education. The tournament, scheduled for Saturday, June 24, began in 2010 with a few friends getting together for a crabbing tournament on Patcong Creek, with the winner getting bragging rights and everyone enjoying a day on the water.... Today organizers are billing the Assault on Patcong Creek as the largest crabbing tournament in the country, with crabbers and their families coming from as far away as Texas."
  52. ^ Klenk, Steffen. "On The Move: History of South Jersey Railroads", Shore Local, March 29, 2018. Accessed March 21, 2023. "The six-mile long Somers Point Bike Path, a six-mile long trail that stretches between Somers Point and Pleasantville, runs along the former Atlantic City and Shore Railroad. This railroad, also known as the Shore Fast Line, operated from 1907 until 1948 and provided service between Atlantic City and Ocean City."
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  62. ^ "Somers Point Council picks DePamphilis",Ocean City Sentinel, March 2, 2022. Accessed July 29, 2022. "Republicans cited his lengthy government experience in appointing Richard DePamphilis to the open Ward I seat Feb. 24, despite strong support for another nominee.... Members voted 4-1 in favor of DePamphilis over Democrat Lisa Bender.... Former Councilwoman Stacy Ferreri resigned in January, one year into her term.... City Council then unanimously appointed Ken Adams on Jan. 27 to take her place. However, Adams was forced to resign Feb. 3 because it was revealed that his felony conviction in 2004 for theft and misconduct while chief of the Northfield Police Department barred him from serving."
  63. ^ Kelleher, Kristen. "Johnston is new council member in Somers Point", Ocean City Sentinel, August 29, 2029. Accessed March 8, 2020. "Somers Point City Council swore in a new council member, Janice Johnston, during a Thursday, Aug. 22, meeting. Johnston will take over former City Councilman Ron Meischker’s term. Meischker resigned from the council last month. In his resignation letter, Meischker wrote that he purchased a property outside of Somers Point and planned to move out of the city."
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  143. ^ Lemongello, Steven. "Playmate's journey began in Somers Point", The Press of Atlantic City, April 19, 2009. Accessed March 31, 2011. ""From Gregory's to Caroline's to the Anchorage", Jennifer Pershing, 28, listed her hometown drinking establishments, 'pretty much any time I walk into one, I see somebody I know.' The former Jennifer Ackley, a 1998 graduate of Mainland Regional High School, returned to the area this weekend for an appearance at the Trump Taj Mahal Casino Resort - or, as this week's At The Shore puts it, locals and visitors had the chance to 'Party with a Playmate.'"
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  145. ^ Hilt, Ed. "Brief time with Pats enough to make Stone a believer", The Press of Atlantic City, February 3, 2008. Accessed November 19, 2013. "'That was after they came off that (playoff) loss to Denver,' said Stone, from Somers Point, who was in the Patriots' camp in 2006 as a wide receiver after three years with the Oakland Raiders."
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