Pakxan

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Pakxan ປາກຊັນ
District & municipality
Pakxan District
Location of Pakxan district in LaosLocation of Pakxan district in Laos
Coordinates: 18°23′47″N 103°39′21″E / 18.39639°N 103.65583°E / 18.39639; 103.65583
Country Laos
ProvinceBolikhamsai Province
DistrictPakxan District
Elevation153 m (502 ft)
Population (2015)
 • Total45,000
Time zoneUTC+7 (ICT)

Pakxan (Paksan or Muang Pakxan) (Lao ປາກຊັນ, pronounced ) (French: Paksane) is a district and a town in Bolikhamsai Province, in western Laos. It is the capital of Pakxan District. The Nam Xan River joins the Mekong River at Pakxan on the border with Thailand, opposite Bueng Kan. Pakxan is connected to the south of Laos by Route 13.

History

Pakxan was founded in the late-19th century. The Pakxan region had experienced insecurity since the invasion by Annam in 1834, followed by invasions by the Siamese, and Siamese sovereignty over Laos in 1836, and especially after 1865 with the invasions of Haws or "red flags", gangs from southern China. These invasions began to reduce the populations of Xieng Khouang and Bolikhamsai, but it was the Siamese who completed the depopulation by deporting most of the Phou Eun inhabiting the region.

In 1876, Rama V, King of Siam, ordered the creation of Bolikhamsai with the last survivors of the Haw invasion of 1874. Bolikhamsai was placed under the authority of Kha Luang Nong Khai. From 1885, the French, who took over neighboring Vietnam, challenged Siamese sovereignty over Laos. After Auguste Pavie's mission dating the Mekong to Luang Prabang, the Siamese were forced to leave the left bank of the Mekong and evacuate the position they had created at the mouth of the Nam Xan River. At that time, Patchoum Muong (or Paxum) was the largest town near the confluence of the Nam Xan, but it is on the Nam Xan, a half-day by boat up the Mekong.

In the course of the 1890s, missionaries of the Missions étrangères de Paris, attached to the mission of Christianity to a Bangkok-based Keng-Sadok, on the Mekong River, a few miles from the mouth of the Nam Xan. Then the missionaries occupied Pakxan, abandoned by the Siamese, and there built a church. In 1911, Bolikhamsai had about 61 villages with a population of about 4,000 inhabitants. In 1937, when Vientiane Province was cut in half, Pakxan alone had a population of 1,000 people and became the capital of the new province.

The market in Pakxan

Climate

Climate data for Pakxan (1990–2019)
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Mean daily maximum °C (°F) 29.0
(84.2)
30.8
(87.4)
32.6
(90.7)
33.9
(93.0)
32.9
(91.2)
32.1
(89.8)
31.5
(88.7)
31.5
(88.7)
31.8
(89.2)
31.8
(89.2)
30.6
(87.1)
28.7
(83.7)
31.4
(88.6)
Mean daily minimum °C (°F) 16.2
(61.2)
18.2
(64.8)
21.1
(70.0)
23.4
(74.1)
24.3
(75.7)
24.6
(76.3)
24.4
(75.9)
24.4
(75.9)
23.9
(75.0)
22.6
(72.7)
20.0
(68.0)
17.0
(62.6)
21.7
(71.0)
Average precipitation mm (inches) 10
(0.4)
28
(1.1)
53
(2.1)
124
(4.9)
401
(15.8)
690
(27.2)
796
(31.3)
640
(25.2)
431
(17.0)
113
(4.4)
17
(0.7)
5
(0.2)
3,308
(130.3)
Source: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations

References

  1. ^ "Results of Population and Housing Census 2015" (PDF). Lao Statistics Bureau. Retrieved 19 February 2024.
  2. ^ a b c Jean-Louis Archet, Formes et résultat des activités du monde rural dans le Koueng Borikhane (Laos), mémoire de géographie du sous-développement, Université de Provence, Aix-en-Provence, 1973, p.16-17
  3. ^ "Climatology and agroclimatology atlas of the Lao People's Democratic Republic" (PDF). Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. Archived from the original (PDF) on 17 March 2024. Retrieved 17 March 2024.

External links