Names of the days of the week

Italian cameo bracelet representing the days of the week, corresponding to the planets as Roman gods: Diana as the Moon for Monday, Mars for Tuesday, Mercury for Wednesday, Jupiter for Thursday, Venus for Friday, Saturn for Saturday, and Apollo as the Sun for Sunday. Middle 19th century, Walters Art Museum Heptagram of the seven celestial bodies of the week

In many languages, the names given to the seven days of the week are derived from the names of the classical planets in Hellenistic astronomy, which were in turn named after contemporary deities, a system introduced by the Sumerians and later adopted by the Babylonians from whom the Roman Empire adopted the system during late antiquity. In some other languages, the days are named after corresponding deities of the regional culture, beginning either with Sunday or with Monday. The seven-day week was adopted in early Christianity from the Hebrew calendar, and gradually replaced the Roman internundinum.

Sunday remained the first day of the week, being considered the day of the sun god Sol Invictus and the Lord's Day, while the Jewish Sabbath remained the seventh. Emperor Constantine adopted the seven-day week for official use in 321 AD, making the Day of the Sun (dies Solis, "Sunday") a legal holiday.

In the international standard ISO 8601, Monday is treated as the first day of the week, but in many countries it is counted as the second day of the week.

Days named after planets

Greco-Roman tradition

Between the first and third centuries AD, the Roman Empire gradually replaced the eight-day Roman nundinal cycle with the seven-day week. The earliest evidence for this new system is a Pompeiian graffito referring to 6 February (ante diem viii idus Februarias) of the year 60 AD as dies solis ("Sunday"). Another early witness is a reference to a lost treatise by Plutarch, written in about 100 AD, which addressed the question of: "Why are the days named after the planets reckoned in a different order from the 'actual' order?" The treatise is lost, but the answer to the question is known; see planetary hours.

The Ptolemaic system of planetary spheres asserts that the order of the heavenly bodies from the farthest to the closest to the Earth is Saturn, Jupiter, Mars, Sun, Venus, Mercury, and the Moon; objectively, the planets are ordered from slowest to fastest moving as they appear in the night sky.

The days were named after the classical planets of Hellenistic astrology, in the order: Sun (Helios), Moon (Selene), Mars (Ares), Mercury (Hermes), Jupiter (Zeus), Venus (Aphrodite), and Saturn (Cronus).

The seven-day week spread throughout the Roman Empire in late antiquity. By the fourth century AD, it was in wide use throughout the Empire.

The Greek and Latin names are as follows:

Day:
(see Irregularities)
Sunday
Sōl or Helios
(Sun)
Monday
Luna or Selene
(Moon)
Tuesday
Mars or Ares
(Mars)
Wednesday
Mercurius or Hermes
(Mercury)
Thursday
Jove or Zeus
(Jupiter)
Friday
Venus or Aphrodite
(Venus)
Saturday
Saturnus or Cronus
(Saturn)
Greek ἡμέρα Ἡλίου
hēméra Hēlíou
ἡμέρα Σελήνης
hēméra Selḗnēs
ἡμέρα Ἄρεως
hēméra Áreōs
ἡμέρα Ἑρμοῦ
hēméra Hermoû
ἡμέρα Διός
hēméra Diós
ἡμέρα Ἀφροδίτης
hēméra Aphrodítēs
ἡμέρα Κρόνου
hēméra Krónou
Latin diēs Sōlis diēs Lūnae diēs Mārtis diēs Mercuriī diēs Iovis diēs Veneris diēs Sāturnī
Romance languages

Except for in Portuguese, Galician and Mirandese, the Romance languages preserved the Latin names, except for the names of Sunday, which was replaced by Dominicus (Dominica), that is, "the Lord's Day", and of Saturday, which was named for the Jewish Shabbat. Mirandese and Portuguese use numbered weekdays (see below), but retain sábado and demingo/domingo for weekends.

Day
(see Irregularities)
Sunday
Sōl (Sun)
Monday
Luna (Moon)
Tuesday
Mars (Mars)
Wednesday
Mercurius (Mercury)
Thursday
Jove (Jupiter)
Friday
Venus (Venus)
Saturday
Saturnus (Saturn)
Portuguese domingo segunda-feira terça-feira quarta-feira quinta-feira sexta-feira sábado
Galician domingo luns / Segunda feira martes / Terza feira /Terceira feira mércores / Corta feira / Cuarta feira xoves / Quinta feira venres / Sexta feira sábado
Asturian domingu llunes martes miércoles xueves vienres sábadu
Spanish domingo lunes martes miércoles jueves viernes sábado
Occitan dimenge diluns dimars dimècres dijòus divendres dissabte
Aranese Occitan dimenge deluns dimars dimèrcles dijaus diuendres dissabte
Catalan diumenge dilluns dimarts dimecres dijous divendres dissabte
French dimanche lundi mardi mercredi jeudi vendredi samedi
Italian domenica lunedì martedì mercoledì giovedì venerdì sabato
Lombard (Milanese) domenega lunedì martedì mercoldì giovedì venerdì sabet
Lombard (Bresciano) duminica lunedé martedé mercoldé gioedé venerdé sabot
Ligurian doménga lunedì mâtesdì mâcordì zéuggia venardì sàbbo
Neapolitan dummeneca lunnerì marterì miercurì gioverì viernarì sàbbatu
Sicilian dumìnica luni marti mèrcuri jovi vènniri sàbbatu
Corsican dumenica luni marti màrcuri ghjovi vènnari sàbatu
Romanian duminică luni marți miercuri joi vineri sâmbătă
Venetian domenega luni marti mèrcore zobia vénare sabo
Sardinian domíniga,
domiga,
etc.
lunis martis,
maltis
mélcuris,
mércunis,
etc.
gióbia,
gioja,
etc.
chenàbura,
cenarva,
etc.
sàpadu,
sàuru,
etc.
Friulian domenie lunis martars miercus joibe vinars sabide
Val Badia Ladin domënia lönesc mertesc,
dedolönesc
mercui,
dedemesaledema
jöbia vëndres sabeda
Gherdëina Ladin dumënia lunesc merdi mierculdi juebia vënderdi sada
Puter Romansh dumengia lündeschdi mardi marculdi gövgia venderdi sanda
Vallader Romansh dumengia lündeschdi mardi marcurdi gövgia venderdi sonda
Surmiran Romansh dumengia glindesde marde mesemda gievgia venderde sonda
Rumantsch Grischun dumengia glindesdi mardi mesemna gievgia venderdi sonda
Sursilvan Romansh dumengia gliendisdis mardis mesjamna gievgia venderdis sonda
Sutsilvan Romansh dumeingia gliendasgis margis measeanda gievgia vendargis sonda
Celtic languages

Early Old Irish adopted the names from Latin, but introduced separate terms of Norse origin for Wednesday, Thursday and Friday, then later supplanted these with terms relating to church fasting practices.

Day
(see Irregularities)
Sunday
Sōl (Sun)
Monday
Luna (Moon)
Tuesday
Mars (Mars)
Wednesday
Mercurius (Mercury)
Thursday
Iuppiter (Jupiter)
Friday
Venus (Venus)
Saturday
Saturnus (Saturn)
Old Irish Diu srol
Dies scrol
Diu luna Diu mart Diu iath Diu eathamon Diu triach Diu saturn
Old Irish (later) Diu domnica Diu luna Diu mart Diu cétaín Diu eter dib aínib Diu aíne Diu saturn
Irish An Domhnach
Dé Domhnaigh
An Luan
Dé Luain
An Mháirt
Dé Máirt
An Chéadaoin
Dé Céadaoin
An Déardaoin
Déardaoin
An Aoine
Dé hAoine
An Satharn
Dé Sathairn
Scottish Gaelic Didòmhnaich or
Latha/Là na Sàbaid
Diluain Dimàirt Diciadain Diardaoin Dihaoine Disathairne
Manx Jedoonee Jelune Jemayrt Jecrean Jerdein Jeheiney Jesarn
Welsh dydd Sul dydd Llun dydd Mawrth dydd Mercher dydd Iau dydd Gwener dydd Sadwrn
Cornish Dy' Sul Dy' Lun Dy' Meurth Dy' Mergher Dy' Yow Dy' Gwener Dy' Sadorn
Breton Disul Dilun Dimeurzh Dimerc’her Diriaou Digwener Disadorn
Adoptions from Romance

Albanian adopted the Latin terms for Tuesday, Wednesday and Saturday, adopted translations of the Latin terms for Sunday and Monday, and kept native terms for Thursday and Friday. Other languages adopted the week together with the Latin (Romance) names for the days of the week in the colonial period. Several constructed languages also adopted the Latin terminology.

Day:
(see Irregularities)
Sunday
Sōl (Sun)
Monday
Luna (Moon)
Tuesday
Mars (Mars)
Wednesday
Mercurius (Mercury)
Thursday
Iuppiter (Jupiter)
Friday
Venus (Venus)
Saturday
Saturnus (Saturn)
Albanian e diel e hënë e martë e mërkurë e enjte e premte e shtunë
Filipino Linggó Lunes Martes Miyerkoles Huwebes or colloquially Webes Biyernes Sabado
Chamorro Damenggo Lunes Mattes Metkoles Huebes Betnes Sabalu
Māori Rā Tapu (rā + tapu = "holy day") Rāhina (rā + Māhina = day + Moon) Rātū (rā + Tūmatauenga = day + Mars) Rāapa (rā + Apārangi = day + Mercury) Rāpare (rā + Pareārau = day + Jupiter) Rāmere (rā + Mere = day + Venus) (rā + horoi = "washing day")
Uropi Soldia Lundia Mardia Mididia Zusdia Wendia Sabadia
Universalglot diodai lundai mardai erdai jovdai vendai samdai
Neo Domin(ko) Lundo Tud Mirko Jov Venso Sab
Idiom Neutral soldi lundi marsdi merkurdi yovdi vendrdi saturndi
ApI Interlingua sol-die luna-die marte-die mercurio-die jove-die venere-die sabbato,
saturno-die
Interlingua dominica lunedi martedi mercuridi jovedi venerdi sabbato
Interlingue soledí lunedí mardí mercurdí jovedí venerdí saturdí
Lingua Franca Nova soldi lundi martedi mercurdi jovedi venerdi saturdi
Mondial soldi lundi mardi mierdi jodi vendi samdi
INTAL sundi lundi mardi merkurdi jodi venerdi saturdi
Novial sundie lundie mardie mercurdie, merkurdie (older) jodie venerdie saturdie
Ido sundio lundio mardio merkurdio jovdio venerdio saturdio
Esperanto dimanĉo lundo mardo merkredo ĵaŭdo vendredo sabato

With the exception of sabato, the Esperanto names are all from French, cf. French dimanche, lundi, mardi, mercredi, jeudi, vendredi.

Germanic tradition

The Germanic peoples adapted the system introduced by the Romans by substituting the Germanic deities for the Roman ones (with the exception of Saturday) in a process known as interpretatio germanica. The date of the introduction of this system is not known exactly, but it must have happened later than 100 AD but before the introduction of Christianity during the 6th to 7th centuries, i.e., during the final phase or soon after the collapse of the Western Roman Empire. This period is later than the Common Germanic stage, but still during the phase of undifferentiated West Germanic. The names of the days of the week in North Germanic languages were not calqued from Latin directly, but taken from the West Germanic names.

Day:
(see Irregularities)
Sunday
Sunna/Sól
Monday
Mona/Máni
Tuesday
Tiw/Tyr
Wednesday
Woden/Odin
Thursday
Thunor/Thor
Friday
Frige or Freya
Saturday
Saturn
Old English Sunnandæg Mōnandæg Tīwesdæg Wōdnesdæg Þunresdæg Frīgedæg Sæternesdæg
Old Saxon Sunnundag *Mānundag *Tiuwesdag *Thingesdag Wōdanesdag *Thunaresdag Frīadag *Sunnunāƀand, *Satarnesdag
Old High German Sunnûntag Mânetag Zîestag Wuotanestag Donarestag Frîjatag Sunnûnâband, Sambaztag
Middle Low German Sunnedag Manedag Dingesdag Wodenesdag Donersdag Vrīdag Sunnenavend, Satersdag
German Sonntag Montag Dienstag, Ziestag (Alemannic German) Mittwoch (older Wutenstag) Donnerstag Freitag Samstag, Sonnabend, (in parts of Eastern Germany)
Yiddish Zuntik – זונטיק Montik – מאנטיק Dinstik – דינסטיק Mitvokh – מיטוואך Donershtik – דאנערשטיק Fraytik – פרײַטיק Shabbes – שבת
Luxembourgish Sonndeg Méindeg Dënschdeg Mëttwoch Donneschdeg Freideg Samschdeg
Scots Saubath, Sunday Monanday Tysday Wadensday Fuirsday Friday Seturday
Dutch zondag maandag dinsdag woensdag donderdag vrijdag zaterdag
Afrikaans Sondag Maandag Dinsdag Woensdag Donderdag Vrydag Saterdag
Low German Sünndag Maandag Dingsdag Middeweek, Goonsdag (rarely Woonsdag) Dünnerdag Freedag Sünnavend, Saterdag
West Frisian snein moandei tiisdei woansdei tongersdei freed sneon, saterdei
Saterland Frisian Sundai Moundai Täisdai Middewíek Tuunsdai Fräindai Snäivende, Sneeuwende
Heligoland
North Frisian
Sendai Mundai Taisdai Meddeweeken Tünnersdai Fraidai Senin
Amrum/Föhr
North Frisian
söndai mundai teisdai wäärnsdei (Amrum), weedensdai (Föhr) süürsdai (Amrum), tüürsdai (Föhr) freidai söninj-er, saninj-er
Sylt North Frisian Sendai Mondai Tiisdai Winjsdai Türsdai Friidai Seninj-en
Wiedingharde
North Frisian
sändäi mundäi, moondai tee(s)däi-e wjinsdäi tördäi-e, türdai-e fraidäi sänjin-e
Mooring North Frisian saandi moundi täisdi weensdi törsdi fraidi saneene
Karrharde
North Frisian
sandäi moundäi täi(er)sdäi weene(s)dai, weensdai tönersdäi fräidäi saneene
Northern Goesharde North Frisian saandi (Ockholm), sandi (Langenhorn) moondi (Ockholm), moundi (Langenhorn) teesdi (Ockholm), täisdi (Langenhorn) weensdi (Ockholm), winsdi (Langenhorn) tünersdi fraidi saneene
Halligen North Frisian sondii mööndii taisdii maaderwich tonersdii fraidii soneene
Icelandic sunnudagur mánudagur þriðjudagur miðvikudagur fimmtudagur föstudagur laugardagur
Old Norse sunnudagr mánadagr tysdagr óðinsdagr þórsdagr frjádagr laugardagr, sunnunótt
Faroese sunnudagur mánadagur týsdagur mikudagur, ónsdagur (Suðuroy) hósdagur, tórsdagur (Suðuroy) fríggjadagur leygardagur
Nynorsk Norwegian sundag/søndag måndag tysdag onsdag torsdag fredag laurdag
Bokmål Norwegian søndag mandag tirsdag onsdag torsdag fredag lørdag
Danish søndag mandag tirsdag onsdag torsdag fredag lørdag
Swedish söndag måndag tisdag onsdag torsdag fredag lördag
Elfdalian sunndag mondag tisdag ųosdag tųosdag frjådag lovdag
Adoptions from Germanic
Day
(see Irregularities)
Sunday
Sunna/Sól
Monday
Mona/Máni
Tuesday
Tiw/Tyr
Wednesday
Woden/Odin
Thursday
Thunor/Thor
Friday
Frige or Freya
Saturday
Saturn
Finnish sunnuntai maanantai tiistai keskiviikko torstai perjantai lauantai
Meänkieli pyhä(päivä), sunnuntai maanantai tiistai keskiviikko tuorestai perjantai lau(v)antai
Kven pyhä, sunnuntai maanantai tiistai keskiviikko tuorestai perjantai lauvantai
Southern Sami aejlege måanta dæjsta gaskevåhkoe duarsta bearjadahke laav(v)adahke
Ume Sami ájliege mánnuodahkka dïjstahkka gasskavahkkuo duarastahkka bierjiedahkka lávvuodahkka
Pite Sami ájlek mánnodak dijstak gasskavahko duorasdak bärrjedak lávvodak
Lule Sami sådnåbiejvve, ájllek mánnodahka dijstahka gasskavahkko duorastahka bierjjedahka lávvodahka
Northern Sami sotnabeaivi vuossárga, mánnodat maŋŋebárga, disdat gaskavahkku duorastat bearjadat lávvardat, lávvordat
Inari Sami pasepeivi vuossargâ majebargâ koskokko tuorâstâh, turâstâh vástuppeivi lávárdâh, lávurdâh
Skolt Sami
(for comparison)
pâʹsspeiʹvv vuõssargg mââibargg seärad neljdpeiʹvv piâtnâc, väʹšnnpeiʹvv, västtpeiʹvv sueʹvet
Māori
(transliteration; translation)
Wiki; Rātapu Mane; Rāhina Tūrei; Rātū Wenerei; Rāapa Tāite; Rāpare Paraire; Rāmere Hāterei; Rāhoroi
Volapük sudel mudel tudel vedel dödel fridel zädel

Hindu tradition

Hindu astrology uses the concept of days under the regency of a planet under the term vāsara/vāra, the days of the week being called sūrya-/ravi-, chandra-/soma-, maṅgala-, budha-, guru-/bṛhaspati-, śukra-, and śani-vāsara. śukrá is a name of Venus (regarded as a son of Bhṛgu); guru is here a title of Bṛhaspati, and hence of Jupiter; budha "Mercury" is regarded as a son of Soma, that is, the Moon. Knowledge of Greek astrology existed since about the 2nd century BC, but references to the vāsara occur somewhat later, during the Gupta period (Yājñavalkya Smṛti, c. 3rd to 5th century AD), that is, at roughly the same period or before the system was introduced in the Roman Empire.

In languages of the Indian subcontinent
Sunday
the Sun
(Sūrya, Ravi, Bhānu)
Monday
the Moon
(Chandra, Indu, Soma)
Tuesday
Mars
(Mangala)
Wednesday
Mercury
(Budha)
Thursday
Jupiter
(Bṛhaspati, Guru)
Friday
Venus
(Shukra)
Saturday
Saturn
(Shani)
Angika 𑂉𑂞𑂥𑂰𑂩/𑂩𑂸𑂥
Etbaar/Rôb
𑂮𑂷𑂧𑂰𑂩
Somaar
𑂧𑂁𑂏𑂪
Mangal
𑂥𑂳𑂡
Budh
𑂥𑂹𑂩𑂵𑂮𑂹𑂣𑂞
Brespat
𑂮𑂳𑂍𑂹𑂍𑂳𑂩
Sukkur
𑂮𑂢𑂱𑂒𑂹𑂒𑂩
Sanichchar
Assamese দেওবাৰ/ৰবিবাৰ
Deubar/Robibar
সোমবাৰ
Xombar
মঙ্গলবাৰ
Monggolbar
বুধবাৰ
Budhbar
বৃহস্পতিবাৰ
Brihôshpotibar
শুক্রবাৰ
Xukrobar
শনিবাৰ
Xonibar
Balti Adeed
عدید
Tsandar
چَندار
Angaru
انگارو
Botu
بوتو
Brespod
بریس پود
Shugoru
شوگورو
Shingsher
شنگشر
Bengali রবিবার/সূর্যবার
Robibar/Śurjobar
সোমবার/চন্দ্রবার
Śōmbar/Chandrabār
মঙ্গলবার
Moṅgolbar
বুধবার
Budhbar
বৃহস্পতিবার/গুরুবার
Brihośpotibar/Gurubār
শুক্রবার/জুম্মাবার
Śukrobar/Jummabar
শনিবার
Śonibar
Bhojpuri एतवार
Aitwār
सोमार
Somār
मंगर
Mangar
बुध
Budh
बियफे
Bi'phey
सुक्क
Sukk
सनिच्चर
Sanichchar
Burushaski Adit
اَدِت
Tsandurah
ژَندُرَہ
Angāro
اَنگارو
Bodo
بودو
Birēspat
بِریسپَت
Shukro
شُکرو
Shimshēr
شِمشیر
Chitrali
(Khowar)
Yakshambey
یک شمبے
Doshambey
دو شمبے
Seshambey
سہ شمبے
Charshambey
چار شمبے
Pachambey
پچھمبے
Adina
آدینہ
Shambey
شمبے
Gujarati રવિવાર
Ravivār
સોમવાર
Somvār
મંગળવાર
Mangaḷvār
બુધવાર
Budhvār
ગુરૂવાર
Guruvār
શુક્રવાર
Shukravār
શનિવાર
Shanivār
Hindi रविवार/सूर्यवार
Ravivār/Sūryavār
सोमवार/चन्द्रवार
Somvār/Chandravār
मंगलवार
Mangalvār
बुधवार
Budhavār
गुरुवार
Guruvār
शुक्रवार
Shukravār
शनिवार
Shanivār
Hindko Atwaar
اتوار
Suwar
سؤ وار
Mungal
منگل
Bud
بدھ
Jumiraat
جمعرات
Jummah
جمعہ
Khali
خالي
Hmar Pathienni Thawṭanni Thawleni Nilaini Ningani Zirtawpni Inrinni
Kannada ಭಾನುವಾರ
Bhanu Vaara
ಸೋಮವಾರ
Soma Vaara
ಮಂಗಳವಾರ
Mangala Vaara
ಬುಧವಾರ
Budha Vaara
ಗುರುವಾರ
Guru Vaara
ಶುಕ್ರವಾರ
Shukra Vaara
ಶನಿವಾರ
Shani Vaara
Kashmiri آتھوار
/aːtʰwaːr/
ژٔنٛدرٕوار
/t͡səndrɨwaːr/
بوموار/ بۄنٛوار
/boːmwaːr/ or /bɔ̃waːr/
بۄدوار
/bɔdwaːr/
برَٛسوار/ برٛؠسوار
/braswaːr/ or /brʲaswaːr/
شۆکُروار/ جُمعہ
/ʃokurwaːr/ or /jumaːh/
بَٹہٕ وار
/baʈɨwaːr/
Konkani आयतार
Āytār
सोमार
Somaar
मंगळार
Mangaḷār
बुधवार
Budhavār
भीरेस्तार
Bhirestār
शुक्रार
Shukrār
शेनवार
Shenvār
Maithili 𑒩𑒫𑒱𑒠𑒱𑒢
Ravidin
𑒮𑒼𑒧𑒠𑒱𑒢
Somdin
𑒧𑓀𑒑𑒪𑒠𑒱𑒢
Maṅgaldin
𑒥𑒳𑒡𑒠𑒱𑒢
Budhdin
𑒥𑒵𑒯𑒮𑓂𑒣𑒞𑒲𑒠𑒱𑒢
Brihaspatidin
𑒬𑒳𑒏𑓂𑒩𑒠𑒱𑒢
Śukradin
𑒬𑒢𑒲𑒠𑒱𑒢
Śanidin
Malayalam ഞായര്‍
Nhāyar
തിങ്കള്‍
Tingal
ചൊവ്വ
Chovva
ബുധന്‍
Budhan
വ്യാഴം
Vyāzham
വെള്ളി
Velli
ശനി
Shani
Maldivian އާދީއްތަ
Aadheeththa
ހޯމަ
Hoama
އަންގާރަ
Angaara
ބުދަ
Budha
ބުރާސްފަތި
Buraasfathi
ހުކުރު
Hukuru
ހޮނިހިރު
Honihiru
Marathi रविवार
Ravivār
सोमवार
Somavār
मंगळवार
Mangaḷavār
बुधवार
Budhavār
गुरूवार
Guruvār
शुक्रवार
Shukravār
शनिवार
Shanivār
Meitei (Manipuri) ꯅꯣꯡꯃꯥꯏꯖꯤꯡ
Nongmaijing
ꯅꯤꯡꯊꯧꯀꯥꯕ
Ningthoukaba
ꯂꯩꯄꯥꯛꯄꯣꯛꯄ
Leipakpokpa
ꯌꯨꯝꯁꯀꯩꯁ
Yumsakeisa
ꯁꯒꯣꯜꯁꯦꯟ
Sagolsen
ꯏꯔꯥꯢ
Eerai
ꯊꯥꯡꯖ
Thangja
Nepali आइतवार
Aaitabar
सोमवार
Sombar
मंगलवार
Mangalbar
बुधवार
Budhabar
बिहिवार
Bihibar
शुक्रवार
Sukrabar
शनिवार
Sanibar
Odia ରବିବାର
Rabibāra
ସୋମବାର
Somabāra
ମଙ୍ଗଳବାର
Maṅgaḷabāra
ବୁଧବାର
Budhabāra
ଗୁରୁବାର
Gurubāra
ଶୁକ୍ରବାର
Sukrabāra
ଶନିବାର
Sanibāra
Pashto Etwar
يونۍ
Gul
دوه نۍ
Nehi
درېنۍ
Shoro
څلرنۍ
Ziarat
پنځه نۍ
Jumma
جمعه
Khali
پيلنۍ
Punjabi
(Gurmukhi)
ਐਤਵਾਰ
Aitvār
ਸੋਮਵਾਰ
Sōmvār
ਮੰਗਲਵਾਰ
Mangalvār
ਬੁੱਧਵਾਰ
Buddhvār
ਵੀਰਵਾਰ
Vīrvār
ਸ਼ੁੱਕਰਵਾਰ
Shukkarvār or
ਜੁਮਾ
Jumā
ਸ਼ਨਿੱਚਰਵਾਰ
Shaniccharvār

or ਸ਼ਨੀਵਾਰ
Shanīvār or ਸਨਿੱਚਰਵਾਰ
Saniccharvār or ਸਨੀਵਾਰ
Sanīvār

Punjabi
(Shahmukhi)
Aitwār
ایتوار
Somvār
سوموار
Mangalvār
منگلوار
Buddhvār
بدھوار
Vīr vār
ویر وار
Jumāh جمعہ or

Shukkarvār شکروار

Hafta ہفتہ or

Chanicchar چھنچھر or

Chaniccharvār چھنچھروار

Rohingya rooibar cómbar mongolbar buidbar bicíbbar cúkkurbar cónibar
Santali ᱥᱤᱸᱜᱮ ᱢᱟᱦᱟᱸ
sim̐ge māhām̐
ᱚᱛᱮ ᱢᱟᱦᱟᱸ
ate māhām̐
ᱵᱟᱞᱮ ᱢᱟᱦᱟᱸ
bāle māhām̐
ᱥᱟᱹᱜᱩᱱ ᱢᱟᱦᱟᱸ
sôgun māhām̐
ᱥᱟᱹᱨᱫᱤ ᱢᱟᱦᱟᱸ
sôrdi māhām̐
ᱡᱟᱹᱨᱩᱢ ᱢᱟᱦᱟᱸ
jôrum māhām̐
ᱧᱩᱦᱩᱢ ᱢᱟᱦᱟᱸ
ñuhum māhām̐
Sanskrit भानुवासर
Bhānuvāsara
इन्दुवासर
Induvāsara
भौमवासर
Bhaumavāsara
सौम्यवासर
Saumyavāsara
गुरुवासर
Guruvāsara
भृगुवासर
Bhṛguvāsara
स्थिरवासर
Sthiravāsara
Shina Adit
ادیت
Tsunduro
تساند ورؤ
Ungaro
نگارو
Budo
بوڈو
Brespat
بیرے سپاٹ
Shukur
شوکر
Shimsher
شیم شےر
Sindhi Ācharu
آچَرُ or Ārtvāru آرتوارُ‎
Sūmaru
سُومَرُ
Angāro
اَنڱارو or Mangalu مَنگلُ
Arbā
اَربع or Budharu ٻُڌَرُ
Khamīsa
خَميِسَ or Vispati وِسپَتِ‎
Jum'o
جُمعو or Shukru شُڪرُ
Chancharu
ڇَنڇَرُ or Śanscharu شَنسچَرُ
Sinhala ඉරිදා
Irida
සඳුදා
Sanduda
අඟහරුවාදා
Angaharuwada
බදාදා
Badada
බ්‍රහස්පතින්දා
Brahaspathinda
සිකුරාදා
Sikurada
සෙනසුරාදා
Senasurada
Sylheti ꠞꠂꠛ꠆ꠛꠣꠞ
Roibbar
ꠡꠝ꠆ꠛꠣꠞ
Shombar
ꠝꠋꠉꠟ꠆ꠛꠣꠞ
Mongolbar
ꠛꠥꠗ꠆ꠛꠣꠞ
Budhbar
ꠛꠤꠡꠥꠗ꠆ꠛꠣꠞ
Bishudhbar
ꠡꠥꠇ꠆ꠇꠥꠞ꠆ꠛꠣꠞ/
ꠎꠥꠝ꠆ꠝꠣꠛꠣꠞ
Shukkurbar/Jummabar
ꠡꠘꠤꠛꠣꠞ
Shonibar
Tamil ஞாயிறு
Ñāyiṟu
திங்கள்
Tiṅkaḷ
செவ்வாய்
Cevvāy
புதன்
Putaṉ
வியாழன்
Viyāḻaṉ
வெள்ளி
Veḷḷi
சனி
Caṉi
Telugu ఆదివారం
Aadi Vāram
సోమవారం
Soma Vāram
మంగళవారం
Mangala Vāram
బుధవారం
Budha Vāram
గురువారం
Guru Vāram
శుక్రవారం
Sukra Vāram
శనివారం
Sani Vāram
Urdu Itwār
اتوار
Pīr
پیر
Mangal
منگل
Budh
بدھ
Jumerāt
جمعرات
Jum'ah
جمعہ
Haftah
ہفتہ
Southeast Asian languages

The Southeast Asian tradition also uses the Hindu names of the days of the week. Hindu astrology adopted the concept of days under the regency of a planet under the term vāra, the days of the week being called āditya-, soma-, maṅgala-, budha-, guru-, śukra-, and śani-vāra. śukrá is a name of Venus (regarded as a son of Bhṛgu); guru is here a title of Bṛhaspati, and hence of Jupiter; budha "Mercury" is regarded as a son of Soma, that is, the Moon.

Sunday
the Sun
(Aditya, Ravi)
Monday
the Moon
(Soma, Chandra, Indu)
Tuesday
Mars
(Mangala, Angaraka)
Wednesday
Mercury
(Budha)
Thursday
Jupiter
(Bṛhaspati, Guru)
Friday
Venus
(Shukra)
Saturday
Saturn
(Shani)
Burmese တနင်္ဂနွေ
IPA:
(ta.nangga.new)
တနင်္လာ
IPA:
(ta.nangla)
အင်္ဂါ
IPA:
(Angga)
ဗုဒ္ဓဟူး
IPA:
(Buddhahu)
(afternoon=new day)
ရာဟု
Rahu
ကြာသာပတေး
IPA:
(Krasapate)
သောကြာ
IPA:
(Saukra)
စနေ
IPA:
(Cane)
Mon တ္ၚဲ အဒိုတ်

from Sans. āditya
တ္ၚဲ စန်

from Sans. candra
တ္ၚဲ အၚါ

from Sans. aṅgāra
တ္ၚဲ ဗုဒ္ဓဝါ

from Sans. budhavāra
တ္ၚဲ ဗြဴဗ္တိ

from Sans. bṛhaspati
တ္ၚဲ သိုက်.

from Sans. śukra
တ္ၚဲ သ္ၚိ သဝ်

from Sans. śani
Khmer ថ្ងៃអាទិត្យ
ថ្ងៃចន្ទ
ថ្ងៃអង្គារ
ថ្ងៃពុធ
ថ្ងៃព្រហស្បត្ណិ
ថ្ងៃសុក្រ
ថ្ងៃសៅរ៍
Lao ວັນອາທິດ
ວັນຈັນ
ວັນອັງຄານ
ວັນພຸດ
ວັນພະຫັດ
ວັນສຸກ
ວັນເສົາ
Cham Adit Thôm Angar But jip Suk Thanưchăn
Shan ဝၼ်းဢႃတိတ်ႉ
IPA:
ဝၼ်းၸၼ်
IPA:
ဝၼ်းဢင်းၵၼ်း
IPA:
ဝၼ်းၽုတ်ႉ
IPA:
ဝၼ်းၽတ်း
IPA:
ဝၼ်းသုၵ်း
IPA:
ဝၼ်းသဝ်
IPA:
Thai วันอาทิตย์
Wan Āthit
วันจันทร์
Wan Chan
วันอังคาร
Wan Angkhān
วันพุธ
Wan Phut
วันพฤหัสบดี
Wan Phruehatsabodi
วันศุกร์
Wan Suk
วันเสาร์
Wan Sao
Javanese ꦫꦢꦶꦠꦾ
Raditya
ꦱꦺꦴꦩ
Soma
ꦲꦁꦒꦫ
Anggara
ꦧꦸꦢ
Buda
ꦉꦱ꧀ꦥꦠꦶ
Respati
ꦱꦸꦏꦿ
Sukra
ꦠꦸꦩ꧀ꦥꦼꦏ꧀
Tumpek
Balinese ᬋᬤᬶᬢᬾ
Redité
ᬲᭀᬫ
Soma
ᬳᬂᬕᬭ
Anggara
ᬩᬸᬤ
Buda
ᬯ᭄ᬭᭂᬲ᭄ᬧᬢᬶ
Wrespati
ᬲᬸᬓ᭄ᬭ
Sukra
ᬲᬦᬶᬲ᭄ᬘᬭ
Saniscara
Sundanese ᮛᮓᮤᮒᮦ

Radité

ᮞᮧᮙ
Soma
ᮃᮀᮌᮛ
Anggara
ᮘᮥᮓ
Buda
ᮛᮨᮞ᮪ᮕᮒᮤ
Respati
ᮞᮥᮊᮢ
Sukra
ᮒᮥᮙ᮪ᮕᮨᮊ᮪
Tumpek
Toba Batak Artia Suma Anggara Muda Boraspati Singkora Samisara
Angkola-Mandailing Batak Arita Suma Anggara Muda Boraspati Sikkora Samisara
Simalungun Batak Aditia Suma Anggara Mudaha Boraspati Sihora Samisara
Karo Batak Aditia Suma Nggara Budaha Beraspati Cukra Belah Naik
Pakpak Batak Antia Suma Anggara Budaha/Muda Beraspati Cukerra Belah Naik
Northeast Asian languages
Sunday
the Sun
(Aditya, Ravi)
Monday
the Moon
(Soma, Chandra, Indu)
Tuesday
Mars
(Mangala, Angāraka)
Wednesday
Mercury
(Budha)
Thursday
Jupiter
(Bṛhaspati, Guru)
Friday
Venus
(Shukra)
Saturday
Saturn
(Shani)
Mongolian адъяа
ad'yaa
сумъяа
sum'yaa
ангараг
angarag
буд
bud
бархабадь
barhabad'
сугар
sugar
санчир
sanchir
Kalmyk адъян өдр
ad'yan ödr
сумъян өдр
sum'yan ödr
мингъян өдр
ming'yan ödr
будан өдр
budan ödr
гуръян өдр
gur'yan ödr
шикрян өдр
shikr'yan ödr
шанун өдр
shanun ödr

East Asian tradition

The East Asian naming system for the days of the week closely parallels that of the Latin system and is ordered after the "Seven Luminaries" (七曜 qī yào), which consists of the Sun, Moon and the five planets visible to the naked eye.

The Chinese had apparently adopted the seven-day week from the Hellenistic system by the 4th century AD, although by which route is not entirely clear. It was again transmitted to China in the 8th century AD by Manichaeans, via the country of Kang (a Central Asian polity near Samarkand). The 4th-century AD date, according to the Cihai encyclopedia, is due to a reference to Fan Ning (范寧), an astrologer of the Jin dynasty. The renewed adoption from Manichaeans in the 8th century AD (Tang dynasty) is documented with the writings of the Chinese Buddhist monk Yijing and the Ceylonese Buddhist monk Bu Kong.

The Chinese transliteration of the planetary system was soon brought to Japan by the Japanese monk Kobo Daishi; surviving diaries of the Japanese statesman Fujiwara no Michinaga show the seven-day system in use in Heian Period Japan as early as 1007. In Japan, the seven-day system was kept in use (for astrological purposes) until its promotion to a full-fledged (Western-style) calendrical basis during the Meiji era. In China, with the founding of the Republic of China in 1911, Monday through Saturday in China are now named after the luminaries implicitly with the numbers.

Pronunciations for Classical Chinese names are given in Standard Chinese.
Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday
Celestial Object Sun (日)
First Star – Sun (太陽星)
Moon (月)
Second Star – Moon (太陰星)
Mars (火星)
Third Star – Fire (熒惑星)
Mercury (水星)
Fourth Star – Water (辰星)
Jupiter (木星)
Fifth Star – Wood (歲星)
Venus (金星)
Sixth Star – Metal or Gold (太白星)
Saturn (土星)
Seventh Star – Earth or Soil (鎮星)
Chinese 日曜日
Rìyàorì
月曜日
Yuèyàorì
火曜日
Huǒyàorì
水曜日
Shuǐyàorì
木曜日
Mùyàorì
金曜日
Jīnyàorì
土曜日
Tǔyàorì
Japanese 日曜日
Nichiyōbi
月曜日
Getsuyōbi
火曜日
Kayōbi
水曜日
Suiyōbi
木曜日
Mokuyōbi
金曜日
Kin'yōbi
土曜日
Doyōbi
Korean 일요일
日曜日
Iryoil
월요일
月曜日
Woryoil
화요일
火曜日
Hwayoil
수요일
水曜日
Suyoil
목요일
木曜日
Mogyoil
금요일
金曜日
Geumyoil
토요일
土曜日
Toyoil
Mongolian наран өдөр naraŋ ödör саран өдөр saraŋ ödör гал өдөр gal ödör усан өдөр usaŋ ödör модон өдөр modoŋ ödör төмөр өдөр, алтан өдөр tömör ödör, altaŋ ödör шороон өдөр shorooŋ ödör
Mongolian
(Transliteration from Tibetan)
ням
nyam
даваа
davaa
мягмар
myagmar
лхагва
lhagva
пүрэв
pürev
баасан
baasan
бямба
byamba
Tibetan གཟའ་ཉི་མ།
(gza' nyi ma)
Nyima
གཟའ་ཟླ་བ།
(gza' zla wa)
Dawa
གཟའ་མིག་དམར།
(gza' mig dmar)
Mikmar
གཟའ་ལྷག་པ།
(gza' lhak pa)
Lhakpa
གཟའ་ཕུར་བུ།
(gza' phur bu)
Purbu
གཟའ་པ་སངས།
(gza' pa sangs)
Pasang
གཟའ་སྤེན་པ།
(gza' spen ba)
Penba

Numbered days of the week

Days numbered from Monday

ISO prescribes Monday as the first day of the week with ISO-8601 for software date formats.

The Slavic, Baltic and Uralic languages (except Finnish and partially Estonian and Võro) adopted numbering but took Monday rather than Sunday as the "first day". This convention is also found in some Austronesian languages whose speakers were converted to Christianity by European missionaries.

In Slavic languages, some of the names correspond to numerals after Sunday: compare Russian vtornik (вторник) "Tuesday" and vtoroj (второй) "the second", chetverg (четверг) "Thursday" and chetvjortyj (четвёртый) "the fourth", pyatnitsa (пятница) "Friday" and pyatyj (пятый) "the fifth"; see also the Notes.

Day
Number From One
Monday
Day One
Tuesday
Day Two
Wednesday
Day Three
Thursday
Day Four
Friday
Day Five
Saturday
Day Six
Sunday
Day Seven
ISO 8601 # 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
Russian понедельник
ponedel'nik
вторник
vtornik
среда
sreda
четверг
chetverg
пятница
pyatnitsa
суббота
subbota
воскресенье
voskresen'ye
Belarusian панядзелак
panyadzelak
аўторак
awtorak
серада
serada
чацвер
chats'ver
пятніца
pyatnitsa
субота
subota
нядзеля
nyadzelya
Ukrainian понедiлок
ponedilok
вiвторок
vivtorok
середа
sereda
четвер
chetver
п'ятниця
p'yatnytsya
субота
subota
недiля
nedilya
Lemko Rusyn понедільок
ponedilyok
віторок
vitorok
середа
sereda
четвер
chetver
пятниця
pyatnîtsya
субота
subota
неділя
nedilya
Prešov Rusyn понедїлёк
ponedyilyok
вівторок
vivtorok
середа
sereda
четверь
chetver'
пятніця
pyatnitsya
субота
subota
недїля
nedyilya
Pannonian Rusyn пондзелок
pondzelok
вовторок
vovtorok
стрeдa
streda
штвaртoк
shtvartok
пияток
piyatok
сoбoтa
sobota
нєдзеля
nyedzelya
Slovak pondelok utorok streda štvrtok piatok sobota nedeľa
Czech pondělí úterý středa čtvrtek pátek sobota neděle
Upper Sorbian póndźela wutora srjeda štwórtk pjatk sobota njedźela
Lower Sorbian pónjeźela, pónjeźele wałtora srjoda stwórtk pětk sobota njeźela, njeźelka
Polish poniedziałek wtorek środa czwartek piątek sobota niedziela
Kashubian pòniedzôłk wtórk strzoda czwiôrtk piątk sobòta niedzela
Slovene ponedeljek torek sreda četrtek petek sobota nedelja
Burgenland Croatian pandiljak, ponediljak utorak srijeda četvrtak petak subota nedilja
Serbo-Croatian (Ijekavian/Ekavian/Ikavian) ponedjeljak,
понедјељак
utorak,
уторак
srijeda,
сриједа
četvrtak,
четвртак
petak,
петак
subota,
субота
nedjelja,
недјеља
понедељак,
ponedeljak
среда,
sreda
недеља,
nedelja
ponediljak,
понедилјак
srida,
срида
nedilja,
недилја
Macedonian понеделник
ponedelnik
вторник
vtornik
среда
sreda
четврток
chetvrtok
петок
petok
сабота
sabota
недела
nedela
Bulgarian понеделник
ponedelnik
вторник
vtornik
сряда
sryada
четвъртък
chetvărtăk
петък
petăk
събота
săbota
неделя
nedelya
Interslavic ponedělok,
понедєлок
vtorok,
второк
srěda,
срєда
četvrtok,
четврток
petok,
петок
subota,
субота
nedělja,
недєлја
Lithuanian pirmadienis antradienis trečiadienis ketvirtadienis penktadienis šeštadienis sekmadienis
Latvian pirmdiena otrdiena trešdiena ceturtdiena piektdiena sestdiena svētdiena
Hungarian hétfő kedd szerda Slavic csütörtök Slavic péntek Slavic szombat Hebrew vasárnap
Estonian esmaspäev teisipäev kolmapäev neljapäev reede laupäev pühapäev
Võro iispäiv tõõsõpäiv kolmapäiv nelläpäiv riidi puuľpäiv pühäpäiv
Mongolian
(numerical)
нэг дэх өдөр
neg dekh ödör
хоёр дахь өдөр
hoyor dahi ödör
гурав дахь өдөр
gurav dahi ödör
дөрөв дэх өдөр
döröv dekh ödör
тав дахь өдөр
tav dahi ödör
хагас сайн өдөр
hagas sayn ödör
бүтэн сайн өдөр
büten sayn ödör
Luo Wuok tich Tich ariyo Tich adek Tich ang'uen Tich abich Chieng' ngeso Juma pil
Tok Pisin (Melanesian Pidgin) mande tunde trinde fonde fraide sarere sande
Apma (Vanuatu) ren bwaleh / mande ren karu ren katsil ren kavet ren kalim lesaare sande

In Standard Chinese, the week is referred to as the "Stellar Period" (Chinese: 星期; pinyin: Xīngqī) or "Cycle" (simplified Chinese: 周; traditional Chinese: 週; pinyin: Zhōu).

The modern Chinese names for the days of the week are based on a simple numerical sequence. The word for "week" is followed by a number indicating the day: "Monday" is literally the "Stellar Period One"/"Cycle One", that is, the "First day of the Stellar Period/Cycle", etc. The exception is Sunday, where 日 (rì), "day" or "Sun", is used instead of a number. A slightly informal and colloquial variant to 日 is 天 (tiān) "day", "sky" or "heaven". However, the term 週天 is rarely used compared to 星期天.

Accordingly, the notational abbreviation of the days of the week uses the numbers, for example, 一 for "M" or "Mon(.)", "Monday". The abbreviation of Sunday uses exclusively 日 and not 天. Attempted usage of 天 as such will not be understood.

Colloquially, the week is also known as the "Worship" (simplified Chinese: 礼拜; traditional Chinese: 禮拜; pinyin: Lǐbài), with the names of the days of the week formed accordingly. This is also dominant in certain regional varieties of Chinese.

The following is a table of the Mandarin names of the days of the weeks. Note that standard Taiwan Mandarin pronounces 期 as qí, so 星期 is instead xīngqí. While all varieties of Mandarin may pronounce 星期 as xīngqi and 禮拜/礼拜 as lǐbai, the second syllable with the neutral tone, this is not reflected in the table either for legibility.

Day Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
Standard Modern Chinese 星期一
Xīngqīyī
星期二
Xīngqī'èr
星期三
Xīngqīsān
星期四
Xīngqīsì
星期五
Xīngqīwǔ
星期六
Xīngqīliù
星期日/星期天
Xīngqīrì (or Xīngqītiān)
週一
Zhōuyī
週二
Zhōu'èr
週三
Zhōusān
週四
Zhōusì
週五
Zhōuwǔ
週六
Zhōuliù
週日/週天
Zhōurì (or Zhōutiān, rarely used)
Standard Modern Chinese
(regional, informal, colloquial)
禮拜一
Lǐbàiyī
禮拜二
Lǐbài'èr
禮拜三
Lǐbàisān
禮拜四
Lǐbàisì
禮拜五
Lǐbàiwǔ
禮拜六
Lǐbàiliù
禮拜天/禮拜日
Lǐbàitiān (or Lǐbàirì)

Several Sinitic languages refer to Saturday as 週末 "end of the week" and Sunday as 禮拜. Examples include Shenyang Mandarin, Hanyuan Sichuanese Mandarin, Taishanese, Yudu Hakka, Teochew, Ningbonese, and Loudi Old Xiang. Some Hakka varieties in Taiwan still use the traditional Luminaries.

Days numbered from Sunday

Sunday comes first in order in calendars shown in the table below. In the Abrahamic tradition, the first day of the week is Sunday. Biblical Sabbath (corresponding to Saturday) is when God rested from six-day Creation, making the day following the Sabbath the first day of the week (corresponding to Sunday). Seventh-day Sabbaths were sanctified for celebration and rest. After the week was adopted in early Christianity, Sunday remained the first day of the week, but also gradually displaced Saturday as the day of celebration and rest, being considered the Lord's Day.

Saint Martin of Dumio (c. 520–580), archbishop of Braga, decided not to call days by pagan gods and to use ecclesiastic terminology to designate them. While the custom of numbering the days of the week was mostly prevalent in the Eastern Church, Portuguese, Mirandese and Galician, due to Martin's influence, are the only Romance languages in which the names of the days come from numbers rather than planetary names.

Members of the Religious Society of Friends (Quakers) historically objected to the pagan etymologies of days and months and substituted numbering, beginning with First Day for Sunday.

Icelandic is a special case within the Germanic languages, maintaining only the Sun and Moon (sunnudagur and mánudagur respectively), while dispensing with the names of the explicitly heathen gods in favour of a combination of numbered days and days whose names are linked to pious or domestic routine (föstudagur, "Fasting Day" and laugardagur, "Washing Day"). The "washing day" is also used in other North Germanic languages, but otherwise the names correspond to those of English.

Day Number from One Sunday (Day One) Monday (Day Two) Tuesday (Day Three) Wednesday (Day Four) Thursday (Day Five) Friday (Day Six) Saturday (Day Seven)
Icelandic sunnudagur mánudagur þriðjudagur miðvikudagur fimmtudagur föstudagur laugardagur
Hebrew יום ראשון‎ yom rishon יום שני‎ yom sheyni יום שלישי‎ yom shlishi יום רביעי‎ yom revi'i יום חמישי‎ yom chamishi יום שישי‎ yom shishi שבת‎ Shabbat
Ecclesiastical Latin Dominica feria secunda feria tertia feria quarta feria quinta feria sexta sabbatum
Portuguese domingo segunda-feira terça-feira quarta-feira quinta-feira sexta-feira sábado
Galician domingo segunda feira terza feira terceira feira corta feira quarta feira quinta feira sexta feira sábado
Mirandese demingo segunda-feira terça-feira quarta-feira quinta-feira sesta-feira sábado
Tetum loron-domingu loron-segunda loron-tersa loron-kuarta loron-kinta loron-sesta loron-sábadu
Greek Κυριακή Kyriakí Δευτέρα Deftéra Τρίτη Tríti Τετάρτη Tetárti Πέμπτη Pémpti Παρασκευή Paraskeví Σάββατο Sávato
Georgian კვირა k'vira ორშაბათი oršabati სამშაბათი samšabati ოთხშაბათი otxšabati ხუთშაბათი xutšabati პარასკევი p'arask'evi შაბათი šabati
Armenian Կիրակի Kiraki Երկուշաբթի Yerkushabti Երեքշաբթի Yerekshabti Չորեքշաբթի Chorekshabti Հինգշաբթի Hingshabti Ուրբաթ Urbat Շաբաթ Shabat
Vietnamese chủ nhật/chúa nhật thứ hai thứ ba thứ tư thứ năm thứ sáu thứ bảy
Somali 𐒖𐒄𐒖𐒆 Axad 𐒘𐒈𐒒𐒕𐒒 Isniin 𐒂𐒖𐒐𐒛𐒆𐒙 Talaado 𐒖𐒇𐒁𐒖𐒋𐒙 Arbaco 𐒅𐒖𐒑𐒕𐒈 Khamiis 𐒃𐒘𐒑𐒋𐒙 Jimco 𐒈𐒖𐒁𐒂𐒘 Sabti
Amharic እሑድ əhud ሰኞ säñño ማክሰኞ maksäñño ረቡዕ räbu, ሮብ rob ሐሙስ hamus ዓርብ arb ቅዳሜ ḳədame
Arabic الأَحَد al-ʔaḥad الإثنين al-iṯnayn الثُّلَاثاء aṯ-ṯulāṯāʔ الأَرْبعاء al-ʔarbiʕāʔ الخَمِيسُ al-ḵamīs الجُمُعَة al-jumuʕah (also الجُمْعَة al-jumʕah ) السَّبْت as-sabt
Maltese il-Ħadd it-Tnejn it-Tlieta l-Erbgħa il-Ħamis il-Ġimgħa is-Sibt
Malay
(incl. Indonesian and Malaysian)
Ahad or Minggu Isnin or Senin Selasa Rabu K(h)amis Juma(a)t Sabtu
Javanese Ngahad, Ngakad, Minggu Senèn Selasa Rebo Kemis Jemuwah Setu
Sundanese Minggu / Minggon Senén Salasa Rebo Kemis Jumaah Saptu
Persian یکشنبه yekšanbe دوشنبه došanbe سه‌شنبه sešanbe چهارشنبه čāhāršanbe پنجشنبه panjšanbe آدینه or جمعه ādine or djom'e شنبه šanbe
Kazakh Жексенбі Jeksenbı Дүйсенбі Düisenbı Сейсенбі Seisenbı Сәрсенбі Särsenbı Бейсенбі Beisenbı Жұма Jūma Сенбі Senbı
Karakalpak Ekshembi yekşembı Dúyshembi düişembı Siyshembi sişembı Sárshembi särşembı Piyshembi pişembı Jumа jūma Shembі şembı
Tatar Якшәмбе yakşämbe Дүшәмбе düşämbe Сишәмбе sişämbe Чәршәмбе çärşämbe Пәнҗешәмбе pänceşämbe Җомга comga Шимбә şimbä
Khowar یک شمبے yak shambey دو شمبے du shambey سہ شمبے sey shambey چار شمبے char shambey پچھمبے pachhambey آدینہ adina شمبے
Kurdish Yekşem Duşem Sêşem Çarşem Pêncşem În Şemî
Uyghur يەكشەنبە, yekshenbe دۈشەنبە, düshenbe سەيشەنبە, seyshenbe چارشەنبە, charshenbe پەيشەنبە, peyshenbey جۈمە, jüme شەنبە, shenbe
Old Turkic birinç kün ikinç kün üçünç kün törtinç kün beşinç kün altınç kün yetinç kün
Turkish Pazar Pazartesi Salı Çarşamba Perşembe Cuma Cumartesi
Azerbaijani Bazar Bazar ertəsi Çərşənbə axşamı Çərşənbə Cümə axşamı Cümə Şənbə
Uzbek Yakshanba Dushanba Seshanba Chorshanba Payshanba Juma Shanba
Navajo Damóo/Damíigo Damóo Biiskání Damóo dóó Naakiską́o Damóo dóó Tááʼ Yiską́o Damóo dóó Dį́į́ʼ Yiską́o Ndaʼiiníísh Yiską́o Damóo

Days numbered from Saturday

In Swahili, the day begins at sunrise, unlike in the Arabic and Hebrew calendars where the day starts at sunset (therefore an offset of twelve hours on average), and unlike in the Western world where the day starts at midnight (therefore an offset of six hours on average). Saturday is therefore the first day of the week, as it is the day that includes the first night of the week in Arabic.

Etymologically speaking, Swahili has two "fifth" days. The words for Saturday through Wednesday contain the Bantu-derived Swahili words for "one" through "five". The word for Thursday, Alhamisi, is of Arabic origin and means "the fifth" (day). The word for Friday, Ijumaa, is also Arabic and means (day of) "gathering" for the Friday noon prayers in Islam.

Day
Number from One
Saturday
Day One
Sunday
Day Two
Monday
Day Three
Tuesday
Day Four
Wednesday
Day Five
Thursday
Day Six
Friday
Day Seven
Swahili jumamosi jumapili jumatatu jumanne jumatano alhamisi ijumaa

Mixing of numbering and astronomy

In the Žejane dialect of Istro-Romanian, lur (Monday) and virer (Friday) follow the Latin convention, while utorek (Tuesday), sredu (Wednesday), and četrtok (Thursday) follow the Slavic convention.

Day Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
Istro-Romanian, Žejane dialect lur utorek sredu četrtok virer simbota dumireca

There are several systems in the different Basque dialects.

Day Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
Standard Basque, Guipuscoan Basque astelehena ("week-first") asteartea ("week-between") asteazkena ("week-last") osteguna ("Ortzi/Sky day") ostirala (see Ortzi) larunbata ("fourth", "meeting of friends"), neskenegun ("girls' day") igandea
Biscayne Basque astelena ("week-first"), ilen ("Moon day") martitzena ("Mars day") eguaztena ("day last") eguena ("day of days", "day of light") barikua ("day without supper"), egubakotx zapatua (compare with Spanish sábado from Sabbath) domeka (from Latin Dominica )

In Judaeo-Spanish (Ladino), which is mainly based on a medieval version of Spanish, the five days of Monday–Friday closely follow the Spanish names. For Sunday is used the Arabic name, which is based on numbering (meaning "Day one" or "First day"), because a Jewish language was not likely to adapt a name based on "Lord's Day" for Sunday. As in Spanish, the Ladino name for Saturday is based on Sabbath. However, as a Jewish language—and with Saturday being the actual day of rest in the Jewish community—Ladino directly adapted the Hebrew name, Shabbat.

Day Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday
Judaeo-Spanish (Ladino) aljhad or alhadh lunes martes miércoles or mierkoles juğeves or djueves viernes shabat

The days of the week in Meitei language (officially known as Manipuri language) originated from the Sanamahi creation myth of Meitei mythology.

Sunday
the Hill
Monday
King's Climb
Tuesday
Earth's Birth
Wednesday
Houses Built
Thursday
Horses Rode
Friday
Blood Flood
Saturday
Swords Washed
Meitei Nongmaiching Ningthoukaba
Leibakpokpa
Yumsakeisa
Sagonsen
Eerai
Thangcha

See also

Notes

Sunday

☉1 From Latin Dominicus (Dominica) or Greek Κυριακή (Kyriakí)

☉2 Holy Day and First-Day of the Week (Day of the Sun -> Light -> Resurrection -> Born again) (Christianity)

☉3 Resurrection (Christianity)

☉4 Bazaar Day

☉5 Market Day

☉6 No Work

☉7 Full good day

☉8 Borrowed from English week

☉9 From an Old Burmese word, not of Indic origin.

Monday

☽1 After No Work

☽2 After Bazaar

☽3 Head of Week

☽4 Master (as in Pir, because Muhammad was born on a Monday)

☽5 From an Old Burmese word, not of Indic origin.

☽6 First day of the week

Tuesday

♂1 Thing (Assembly), of which god Tyr/Ziu was the patron.

♂2 Second day of the week (cf. Hungarian kettő 'two')

♂3 Third day of the week.

♂4 From Arabic ath-Thalaathaaʼ 'third day'

♂5 From Proto-Slavic vъtorъ 'second'

Wednesday

☿1 Mid-week or Middle

☿2 The First Fast (Christianity)

☿3 Third day of the week

Thursday

♃1 The day between two fasts (An Dé idir dhá aoin, contracted to An Déardaoin) (Christianity)

♃2 Five (Arabic)

♃3 Fifth day of the week.

♃4 Fourth day of the week.

Friday

♀1 The Fast (Celtic) or Fasting Day (Icelandic) (Christianity)

♀2 Good Friday or Preparation (Christianity)

♀3 Jumu'ah (Friday Prayer)

♀4 Gathering/Assembly/Meeting (Islam) – in Malta with no Islamic connotations

♀5 Fifth day of the week

♀6 Borrowed from Germanic languages

Or canàbara, cenàbara, cenàbera, cenàbura, cenarba, chenàbara, chenabra, chenapra, chenàpura, chenarpa, chenàura, cianàbara, chenabura; meaning holy supper as preparation to the sabbathday(Saturday)

Saturday

♄1 Shabbat (Jewish and Christian Sabbath)

♄2 Wash or Bath day

♄3 Sun-eve (Eve of Sunday)

♄4 After the Gathering (Islam)

♄5 End of the Week (Arabic Sabt 'rest')

♄6 Week

♄7 Half good day

♄8 Half day

Notes

  1. ^ Or domigu, domingu, domínica, dominica, domínigu, dumínica, dumíniga.
  2. ^ Or mércuis, mérculis, mércuris.
  3. ^ Or gióvia, zóbia, giògia, zògia.
  4. ^ Or canàbara, cenàbara, cenàbera, cenàbura, cenarba, chenàbara, chenabra, chenapra, chenàpura, chenarpa, chenàura, cianàbara.
  5. ^ Or sàbadu, sàbudu, sàburu, sàpatu.

References

  1. ^ derived from Arabic: ثالث, romanized: ṯāliṯ, lit. 'third'
  2. ^ çehar-şenbe (derived from Persian)
  3. ^ penc-şenbih (derived from Persian)
  1. ^ "What is the First Day of the Week?".
  2. ^ Schaff, Philip (1884). History of the Christian Church Vol. III. Edinburgh: T&T Clark. p. 380. Retrieved 15 March 2019.
  3. ^ Nerone Caesare Augusto Cosso Lentuol Cossil fil. Cos. VIII idus Febr(u)arius dies solis, luna XIIIIX nun(dinae) Cumis, V (idus Februarias) nun(dinae) Pompeis. Robert Hannah, "Time in Written Spaces", in: Peter Keegan, Gareth Sears, Ray Laurence (eds.), Written Space in the Latin West, 200 BC to 300 AD, A&C Black, 2013, p. 89.
  4. ^ E. G. Richards, Mapping Time, the Calendar and History, Oxford 1999. p. 269
  5. ^ Falk, Michael (19 March 1999). "Astronomical names for the days of the week". Journal of the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada. 93 (1999–06): 122–133. Bibcode:1999JRASC..93..122F.
  6. ^ "Days of the Week Meaning and Origin". Astrologyclub.org. 28 May 2016. Retrieved 25 December 2016.
  7. ^ Dio Cassius. Ῥωμαϊκὴ Ἱστορία. Book 37, Sections 16-19. English translation.
  8. ^ "Days of the week in Portuguese".
  9. ^ replacing a system of n "one-, three-, five-, ten-, or fifteen-day periods" (>Dáibhí Ó Cróinín, 2003, p. 7). MS. 17 (now held at St. John's College, Oxford), dating at least from 1043, records five-week-day lists, which it names as follows: secundum Hebreos (according to the Hebrews); secundum antiquos gentiles (according to the ancient gentiles, i.e., Romans); secundum Siluestrum papam (according to Pope Sylvester I, i.e., a list derived from the apocryphal Acta Syluestri); secundum Anglos (according to the English); secundum Scottos (according to the Irish).
  10. ^ "we have a clear reflex of the Indo-European nominative singular, with a lengthened grade, giving archaic Old Irish diu; it is suggested that what we have in the Oxford list and in Cormac's Glossary is the oldest form of Old Irish dia, representing the old nominative case of the noun in adverbial usage." Dáibhí Ó Cróinín, 2003, p. 12
  11. ^ The word scrol is glossed in Sanas Cormaic as Scroll .i. soillsi, unde est aput Scottos diu srol.i. dies solis "Srcoll, that is brightness, whence 'diu srol' among the Irish, that is Sunday".
  12. ^ Ó Cróinín has Diu luna as "represent the transitional form between Latin dies lunae and the later, Classical Old Irish dia luain ... a translation of, not a calque on, the Latin ... would seem to reflect a pre-assimilation state in respect of both words," Dáibhí Ó Cróinín, 2003, p. 13
  13. ^ "The Irish word perhaps derives from Latin forms where cases other than the genitive were used, e.g., Marte."Dáibhí Ó Cróinín, 2003, p. 15
  14. ^ A form unique to Irish, meaning uncertain. In Old Irish, íath can mean "land." A "very old" word for Wednesday, Mercúir (borrowed from the Latin (dies) Mercurii), does occur in early Leinster poems but Ó Cróinín is of the belief that Diu eathamon "reflects a still older Irish word for 'Wednesday.'"
  15. ^ A form unique to Irish. Ó Cróinín writes, "I suggest that it means simply 'on Thursday' ... it is temporal dat. of an n-stem (nom. sg. etham, gen. sg. ethamon – as in our Oxford list – and acc./dat. sg. ethamain)." (2003, p. 17) He furthermore suggests that etham ('arable land') "may be a noun of agency from ith (gen. sg. etho), with a meaning like corn-maker or some such thing; Diu eathamon might then be a day for sowing seed in a weekly regimen of activities such as we find in Críth Gablach." Dáibhí Ó Cróinín, 2003, p. 17. The form Ethomuin is found in Rawlinson B 502.
  16. ^ A form unique to Irish, its meaning unclear.
  17. ^ https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/SQA-Gaelic_Orthographic_Conventions-En-e.pdf, p. 17.
  18. ^ Boyce, Mary (July 1995). "Languages in contact I: Creating new words for Maori". New Zealand Studies. 5 (2). doi:10.26686/jnzs.v5i2.473.
  19. ^ Grimm, Jacob (2004). Teutonic Mythology. Courier Corporation. pp. 122–123. ISBN 978-0-486-43546-6.
  20. ^ "friggjarstjarna". Dictionary of Old Norse Prose. University of Copenhagen. Retrieved 8 July 2021.
  21. ^ Monier-Williams, Sanskrit-English Dictionary (1899), s.v. vāsara.
  22. ^ Monier-Williams, Sanskrit-English Dictionary (1899), s.v. vāra.
  23. ^ The Chinese encyclopaedia Cihai (辭海) under the entry for "seven luminaries calendar" (七曜曆, qī yào lì) has: "method of recording days according to the seven luminaries . China normally observes the following order: Sun, Mon, Mars, Mercury, Jupiter, Venus, and Saturn. Seven days make one week, which is repeated in a cycle. Originated in ancient Babylon (or ancient Egypt according to one theory). Used by the Romans at the time of the 1st century AD, later transmitted to other countries. This method existed in China in the 4th century AD. It was also transmitted to China by Manichaeans in the 8th century AD from the country of Kang (康) in Central Asia" (translation after Bathrobe's Days of the Week in Chinese, Japanese & Vietnamese, plus Mongolian and Buryat (cjvlang.com)
  24. ^ Falk, Michael (2004). "Astronomical names for the days of the week". Journal of the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada. 93 (1999–06): 122–133. arXiv:astro-ph/0307398. Bibcode:1999JRASC..93..122F. doi:10.1016/j.newast.2003.07.002. S2CID 118954190.
  25. ^ Gray, 2012. The Languages of Pentecost Island.
  26. ^ Ren is "day". Numbered weekdays are used for Tuesday-Friday and sometimes Monday; the names for Saturday and Sunday come from English.
  27. ^ "Days of the Week in Chinese: Three Different Words for 'Week'". Cjvlang. Retrieved 27 October 2016.
  28. ^ "Swahili days, months, dates". online.fr. Archived from the original on 9 August 2007.
  29. ^ Archived 20 November 2008 at the Wayback Machine
  30. ^ Astronomy and Basque Language, Henrike Knörr, Oxford VI and SEAC 99 "Astronomy and Cultural Diversity", La Laguna, June 1999. It references Alessandro Bausani, 1982, The prehistoric Basque week of three days: archaeoastronomical notes, The Bulletin of the Center for Archaeoastronomy (Maryland), v. 2, 16–22.
  31. ^ See the image in Anthony, Charlotte (22 July 2012). "Rushing to preserve Ladino legacies". Crescent City Jewish News. Retrieved 31 May 2016. The Ladino names are in the right-hand column, written in Hebrew characters.
  32. ^ Wakoklon Heelel Thilel Salai Amai Eelon Pukok PuYa
  33. ^ Wachetlon Pathup PuYa
  34. ^ Kham Oi Yang Oi Sekning PuYa
  35. ^ Nunglekpam, Premi Devi (25 May 2018). Short Essays on Women and Society: Manipuri Women through the Century. FSP Media Publications.

Further reading